Timomachus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Fresco from the Casa dei Dioscuri, believed to exhibit Timomachus' influence

Timomachus of Byzantium (or Timomachos, a transliteration of Τιμόμαχος) was an influential painter of the first century BCE.

Works[edit]

Pliny the Elder, in his Naturalis Historia (35.136), records that Julius Caesar had acquired two paintings by Timomachus, an Ajax and a Medea, which cost him the considerable sum of 80 talents.[1]:178 Scholars have connected these works with the carrying away of a Medea and Ajax from Cyzicus, an ancient port of Anatolia, mentioned in Cicero's In Verrem (2.4.135), and propose that Caesar acquired them there, shortly after his victory at Pharsalus.[2]:308 The paintings, "a pair linked to each other by their rage",[3]:210 were installed in front of the Temple of Venus Genetrix, and remained there until their destruction by fire in 80 CE.

The Anthology of Planudes preserves a number of epigrams on the Medea, which note its incomplete state, and praise its emotional intensity and verisimilitude. Scholars believe that two well-known depictions of Medea preserved at Pompeii were composed under the influence of Timomachus' work.[2]:309-310

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pollitt, J. J. (26 October 1990). The Art of Ancient Greece: Sources and Documents. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-27366-4. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Gurd, Sean Alexander (2007). "Meaning and Material Presence: Four Epigrams on Timomachus's Unfinished Medea". Transactions of the American Philological Association 137 (2): 305–331. doi:10.1353/apa.2008.0003. ISSN 1533-0699. 
  3. ^ Harris, William Vernon (2001). Restraining Rage: The Ideology of Anger Control in Classical Antiquity. Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-00618-8. Retrieved 12 January 2013.