Timothy J. Campbell

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Timothy John Campbell (January 1840 – 1904) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

Life[edit]

Born in County Cavan, Ireland, he emigrated to New York City.

He was a member of the New York State Assembly (New York Co., 6th D.) in 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1875 and 1883.

He was a member of the New York State Senate (6th D.) in 1884 and 1885.

He was elected as a Democrat to the 49th United States Congress, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Samuel S. Cox, was re-elected to the 50th, and was elected again to the 52nd and 53rd United States Congresses, holding office from November 3, 1885, to March 3, 1889; and from March 4, 1891, to March 3, 1895.

Campbell earned a touch of immortality of an attributed nature. He is reported to have said to President Grover Cleveland, upon Cleveland's saying he would not support a bill on the grounds that the bill was unconstitutional, "What's the Constitution between friends?" (Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 16th ed.)

References[edit]

New York Assembly
Preceded by
John Siegerson
New York State Assembly
New York County, 6th District

1868–1873
Succeeded by
Matthew Patten
Preceded by
Matthew Patten
New York State Assembly
New York County, 6th District

1875
Succeeded by
Matthew Patten
Preceded by
Matthew Patten
New York State Assembly
New York County, 6th District

1883
Succeeded by
Peter Henry Jobes
New York State Senate
Preceded by
Thomas F. Grady
New York State Senate
6th District

1884–1885
Succeeded by
Edward F. Reilly
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Samuel S. Cox
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 8th congressional district

1885–1889
Succeeded by
John H. McCarthy
Preceded by
John H. McCarthy
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 8th congressional district

1891–1893
Succeeded by
Edward J. Dunphy
Preceded by
Amos J. Cummings
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 9th congressional district

1893–1895
Succeeded by
Henry C. Miner