Timothy Maude

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Timothy J. Maude
Timothy J Maude bio photo.jpg
Birth name Timothy Joseph Maude
Nickname(s) "Tim"
Born (1947-11-18)November 18, 1947
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.
Died September 11, 2001(2001-09-11) (aged 53)
Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.
Buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service March 1966 – September 2001
Rank US Army O9 shoulderboard rotated.svg Lieutenant general
Commands held U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel
Battles/wars Vietnam War
September 11 attacks 
Awards Distinguished Service Medal ribbon.svg Distinguished Service Medal
US Defense Superior Service Medal ribbon.svg Defense Superior Service Medal
Bronze Star ribbon.svg Bronze Star Medal Legion of Merit ribbon.svg Legion of Merit
Spouse(s) Teri Maude (wife)[1]
Relations Karen Maude (daughter)[1]
Kathleen Koehler (daughter)[1]
Website http://www.maudefoundation.org/

Timothy Joseph "Tim" Maude (November 18, 1947 – September 11, 2001) was a United States Army officer who was killed in the September 11 attacks of 2001.

Maude, a lieutenant general, was the highest ranking U.S. military officer killed in the September 11 attacks and the most senior U.S. Army officer killed by hostile action since Lieutenant General Simon B. Buckner in 1945.[2] Maude had been serving as the U.S. Army's Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel and was at a meeting when American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the west side of the Pentagon. His offices had just days before been moved to the most recently renovated section of the Pentagon.

Early life and education[edit]

Maude was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. He joined the U.S. Army as an enlisted soldier on March 21, 1966 when he was eighteen years old. He had initially intended to become a priest and graduated from the Latin School of Indianapolis, a Roman Catholic seminary high school, but received his commission as a Second Lieutenant upon completing Officer Candidate School in February 1967. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in management from Golden Gate University and a Master of Arts Degree in Public Administration from Ball State University.[1]

Career[edit]

Upon being commissioned he served one year in Vietnam and the rest of his career in the United States, West Germany and South Korea.[1] His assignments included:

Maude was stationed in Washington, D.C. in August 1998 and was nominated as Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel by President Clinton's Secretary of Defense, William S. Cohen, in May 2000.[1]

Maude began the "Army of One" recruiting campaign using television and internet advertising. He had testified before the U.S. Congress concerning the necessity of meeting recruiting goals to fulfill the United States Army's missions. In September 2001 he announced that the Army of One campaign was drawing more recruits and on September 4, 2001 it was reported that the U.S. Army had met its goals early for active duty soldiers and that the U.S. Army Reserve and U.S. Army National Guard would meet theirs by the end of the month.[1]

Views on homosexuality[edit]

Maude was a "point man" for the Don't Ask Don't Tell policy and matters concerning LGBT issues. When Private First Class Barry Winchell was murdered by Calvin Glover because it was rumored that Winchell was gay, Maude was one of the U.S. Army leaders who met with Winchell's mother, Patricia Kutteles.[3]

C. Dixon Osburn, Executive Director of Servicemembers Legal Defense Network, said in a press release: "Lt. Gen. Maude has played a pivotal role in developing and implementing key programs related to LGBT military personnel. In addition to working on the services' most comprehensive 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' training programs, Maude has been an effective leader in working to protect our men and women in uniform from anti-gay harassment."[3][4]

Dates of rank[edit]

Death[edit]

On September 11, 2001, Maude was working as the U.S. Army's Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel and was at a meeting when American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the west side of the Pentagon. His offices had just days before been moved to the most recently renovated section of the Pentagon. He was the highest ranking military officer killed in the attacks, and the senior-most U.S. Army officer killed by enemy action since Simon B. Buckner in 1945.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Maude is survived by his wife, Teri, and two daughters, Karen Maude and Kathleen Koehler.[1]

Awards and decorations[edit]

Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
1st row
Distinguished Service Medal[1]
Defense Superior Service Medal[1]
Legion of Merit with three oak leaf clusters[1]
2nd row
Bronze Star Medal[1]
Purple Heart Medal (posthumously)[1]
Meritorious Service Medal with four oak leaf clusters[1]
3rd row
Army Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters[1]
Army Achievement Medal[1]
Good Conduct Medal
4th row
National Defense Service Medal with one service star
Vietnam Service Medal with four service stars
Armed Forces Reserve Medal
5th row
Army Service Ribbon
Overseas Service Ribbon
Vietnam Campaign Medal
Unit awards
Joint Meritorious Unit Award Valorous Unit Award Meritorious Unit Commendation
Superior Unit Award Republic of Vietnam Gallantry
Cross Unit Citation
Civil Actions Honor Medal, FC

Legacy[edit]

Maude's name is located on Panel S-74 of the National September 11 Memorial’s North Pool, along with the names of those who were aboard United Airlines Flight 93.

Maude was interred at Arlington National Cemetery on October 6, 2001. Almost seven months later, on April 30, 2002, the Lieutenant General Timothy J. Maude Center for Human Resources was dedicated in his honor at the Campbell Barracks in Heidelberg, Germany where he served from 1995–98 as Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel and Installation Management. It was his last assignment before being stationed in Washington, D.C.[1]

In 2010 The United States Army Human Resources Command named their new Center of Excellence at Fort Knox, Kentucky after Maude.[5]

At the National 9/11 Memorial, Maude is memorialized at the South Pool, on Panel S-74.[6]

The Knights of Columbus named the Timothy J. Maude Council 10292 in Wiesbaden, Germany in Maude's memory.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]