Tintern Abbey (band)

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Tintern Abbey
Origin London, England
Genres Psychedelic rock
Years active 1967–1968
Labels Deram Records
Past members Don Smith
David MacTavish
Stuart MacKay
John Dalton
Paul Brett
Terry Goldberg

Tintern Abbey were a British psychedelic rock band that were formed in late 1966 and professionally active between 1967 and 1968. The band are best remembered for their single "Vacuum Cleaner" that has been included on several compilation albums over the years.[1]

History[edit]

Tintern Abbey was formed by Don Smith after meeting David MacTavish at the Overseas Visitors Club in Earls Court London. Smith brought John Dalton into the band after a meeting in the Cromwellian Club in South Kensington and Mactavish brought Stuart Mckay into the band after a meeting at the dole office. Smith left the band after the release of "Beeside"/"Vacuum Cleaner" and completing work on "Snowman". MacTavish was later a member of Big Bertha and Velvet Opera, the latter of which latter-day Tintern Abbey guitarist Paul Brett also later joined.[2][3]

The band released only one 45rpm single on Deram Records, "Beeside"/"Vacuum Cleaner" (Deram 164), in December 1967.[4] Produced by Jonathan Webber, the single failed to sell. At this point the proposed follow up was a song called "Snowman" which had reached mastering stage when Smith left the group.[citation needed] After Smith's leaving, Paul Brett joined as a guitarist. Also, organist Terry Goldberg, originally of the Mark Leeman Five joined to the band.[2] "How Do I Feel Today"/"Do What You Must", was slated for an April 1968 release but never appeared.[4] A full-length LP was allegedly meant to follow in August 1968, but the group had disbanded by then.[4]

Since the band's breakup, the single "Beeside"/"Vacuum Cleaner" has been highly sought after by collectors (selling at £1000 plus) and has been hailed as one of the best examples of British psychedelia.[4][5][6] As such, the band has become something of a cult favorite. Among other places, "Vacuum Cleaner" was re-released on the Nuggets II compilation.

A 7" vinyl EP was released by Paul Brett and John Dalton in 2006 of 4 of the band's 1968-era demo songs, including "How Do I Feel Today", as a benefit for Oxfam.[7] These songs were recorded in 1968 at Tony Pike's studios in Putney, London, but never released until recently and they are only copies of the original acetates.[2] Paul Brett has a collection of songs from that era that he wrote for submission to the LP that never was, including a setting of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum". Brett intends to record these songs and release them to the public.[citation needed]

Dave MacTavish as a solo artist released 1 single "Ooh La La" b/w "Collie Girl" on the Young Blood label in 1973 according to the label dates (then in Germany under "Decca" - license - # DL 25564).[8]

Discography[edit]

Singles[edit]

  • "Beeside"/"Vacuum Cleaner" (Deram DM 164) 1967

EPs[edit]

  • Do What You Must (Self-released) 2006

CDs[edit]

  • "Beeside" can be found on "The Rubble Collection 6" (Bam Caruso)
  • "Vacuum Cleaner" can be found on the Rhino "Nuggets II" box
  • 4 demos (Do What You Must/How Do I Feel Today?/Naked Song/It's Just That The People Can't See) can be found on "What's The Rush, Time Machine Man?" a 2007 CD on UK Rev-Ola

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tintern Abbey Record Details". 45cat. Retrieved 2010-07-17. 
  2. ^ a b c "Interview with Paul Brett". Paul Brett. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  3. ^ Liner Notes, Nuggets II: Original Artyfacts from the British Empire and Beyond, 1964-1969. Rhino Records, 2001.
  4. ^ a b c d "Tintern Abbey Biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  5. ^ Joynson, Vernon. The Tapestry of Delights:The Comprehensive Guide to British Music of the Beat, R&B, Psychedelic and Progressive Eras, 1963-1976. Borderline Productions, 1998, p. 533.
  6. ^ Strong, Martin C. The Great Psychedelic Discography. Canongate, 1997, p. 278.
  7. ^ "Do What You Must". Discogs. Retrieved 2010-07-17. 
  8. ^ "Dave MacTavish Discography". 45cat. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 

External links[edit]