Tinton Falls, New Jersey

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Tinton Falls, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Tinton Falls
Map of Tinton Falls in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Tinton Falls in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tinton Falls, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Tinton Falls, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°16′01″N 74°05′56″W / 40.267°N 74.099°W / 40.267; -74.099Coordinates: 40°16′01″N 74°05′56″W / 40.267°N 74.099°W / 40.267; -74.099[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated August 15, 1950 as New Shrewsbury
Renamed 1975 as Tinton Falls
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Gerald M. Turning [3]
 • Administrator Michael Muscillo [4]
 • Clerk Maureen L. Murphy[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 15.623 sq mi (40.463 km2)
 • Land 15.487 sq mi (40.110 km2)
 • Water 0.136 sq mi (0.352 km2)  0.87%
Area rank 173rd of 566 in state
12th of 53 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 98 ft (30 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 17,892
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 17,976
 • Rank 144th of 566 in state
12th of 53 in county[12]
 • Density 1,155.3/sq mi (446.1/km2)
 • Density rank 361st of 566 in state
44th of 53 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07701, 07712, 07714, 07727, 07753[13][14]
Area code(s) 732[15]
FIPS code 3402573020[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885419[18][2]
Website www.tintonfalls.com

Tinton Falls is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 17,892,[8][9][10] an increase of 2,839 (+18.9%) from the 15,053 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,692 (+21.8%) from the 12,361 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

The borough was formed as New Shrewsbury by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on August 15, 1950, based on the results of a referendum held on July 18, 1950, after breaking away from Shrewsbury Township.[20] It was renamed "Tinton Falls" in 1975, to avoid postal errors.[21][22] The name came from Lewis Morris's plantation, Tinton Manor, which employed free white workers and slaves. The borough is home to the highest waterfall on New Jersey's coastal plain.

History[edit]

The area that is now known as Tinton Falls was originally settled in the late 1600s, probably beginning with the initial land purchases from the Lenni Lenape Native Americans in 1664.[23] Water power and iron ore were likely the incentives that encouraged settlement: shortly after [the land was purchased], a man by the name of James Grover had an ironworks built along the river. Grover was likely the founder of the community, which, in the 1600s, was named "New Shrewsbury".[23] At this time, the waterfall was known to be about 30 feet (9.1 m) high;[24][25] erosion and the destruction of the dam near the ironworks have led to its diminishment.

The ironworks[edit]

Grover’s ironworks was the central fixture of the community, and it was one of the oldest built in the country, predated only by buildings in Jamestown and Massachusetts.[23] In 1675, a half-interest in the ironworks company was purchased by Colonel Lewis Morris, [who obtained a title granting him 3,540 acres (14.3 km2) along the Shrewsbury River]. Morris also obtained land owned by Bartholomew Applegate, who had built a corn mill on the other side of the river. Morris, who procured the land for iron mining, named his holdings "Tintern Manor," after his family lands in Monmouthshire, England.[26] Tintern Abbey, located in Monmouthshire, Wales, is often accepted as the namesake of Tinton Falls.[24][25]

Tintern Abbey
Tintern Abbey in Monmouthshire, Wales, is often accepted as the namesake of Tinton Falls.

In 1691, Colonel Morris died, leaving Tinton Manor (a corruption of “Tintern Manor”) and the ironworks to his nephew of the same name. By 1714, the ironworks had become less profitable, but mention of a Tinton Falls ironworks can be found as late as 1844.

Separation from Shrewsbury Township[edit]

In 1693, Tinton Manor and the surrounding lands were defined as part of Shrewsbury Township. At this time, Shrewsbury included all of the land in eastern Monmouth County. Shrewsbury Township became Shrewsbury Borough in 1926, after many of the municipalities in eastern Monmouth County split from the township. In July 1950, Tinton Falls and Wayside left Shrewsbury Borough, renaming themselves the Borough of New Shrewsbury. To avoid postal confusion and mix-ups with the surrounding borough and township of Shrewsbury, the residents of New Shrewsbury voted to rename the community as "The Borough of Tinton Falls" in 1975.[27][28]

Geography[edit]

Tinton Falls is located at 40°16′00″N 74°05′55″W / 40.266688°N 74.098746°W / 40.266688; -74.098746 (40.266688,-74.098746). According to the United States Census Bureau, Tinton Falls borough had a total area of 15.623 square miles (40.463 km2), of which, 15.487 square miles (40.110 km2) of it is land and 0.136 square miles (0.352 km2) of it (0.87%) is water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950 3,783
1960 7,313 93.3%
1970 8,395 14.8%
1980 7,740 −7.8%
1990 12,361 59.7%
2000 15,053 21.8%
2010 17,892 18.9%
Est. 2013 17,976 [11] 0.5%
Population sources: 1950-1990[29]
2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 17,892 people, 8,355 households, and 4,462 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,155.3 per square mile (446.1 /km2). There were 8,766 housing units at an average density of 566.0 per square mile (218.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 82.39% (14,741) White, 9.34% (1,672) Black or African American, 0.13% (23) Native American, 4.67% (835) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.31% (235) from other races, and 2.14% (382) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.25% (1,118) of the population.[8]

There were 8,355 households, of which 21.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.6% were non-families. 42.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 27.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.95.[8]

In the borough, 19.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 25.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.9 years. For every 100 females there were 78.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 74.2 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,894 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,470) and the median family income was $99,231 (+/- $8,633). Males had a median income of $72,478 (+/- $8,954) versus $53,956 (+/- $7,492) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $40,149 (+/- $2,077). About 3.2% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.2% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 15,053 people, 5,883 households, and 3,976 families residing in the borough. The population density was 965.7 people per square mile (372.8/km2). There were 6,211 housing units at an average density of 398.4 per square mile (153.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.80% White, 13.04% African American, 0.24% Native American, 4.96% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.04% from other races, and 1.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.70% of the population.[30][31]

There were 5,883 households out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.11.[30][31]

In the borough the population was spread out with 25.5% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 36.4% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.2 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the borough was $68,697, and the median income for a family was $79,773. Males had a median income of $58,098 versus $37,857 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,520. About 2.6% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Borough of Tinton Falls operates under the Faulkner Act, using the Mayor-Council form of municipal government (Plan 6), implemented by direct petition as of July 1, 1985.[33] The Mayor is the Chief Executive Officer of the Borough and is elected for a four-year term. The Borough Business Administrator reports to, and may act on behalf of the Mayor, in the Mayor's absence. The Borough Council is the legislative body, made up of five members elected at-large for four-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election every other year as part of the November general election, with the mayoral seat up for vote at the same time that two council seats are being chosen by voters.[6][34] The Borough Council voted in May 2010 to shift its non-partisan elections from May to the November general election, as part of an effort to increase participation of voters and to cut costs associated with the May elections, with savings estimated at nearly $100,000 during the first decade after the change was implemented in the November 2011 vote.[35]

As of 2014, the mayor of Tinton Falls is Gerald M. Turning, whose term of office ends December 31, 2017.[36] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Gary Baldwin (2015), Deputy Council President Christopher Pak (2015), Scott Larkin (2017), John Roche (2017), and Steven P. Schertz (2015).[37]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Tinton Falls is located in the 4th Congressional District[38] and is part of New Jersey's 11th state legislative district.[9][39][40] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Tinton Falls had been in the 12th state legislative district.[41] Prior to the 2010 Census, Tinton Falls had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[41]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 11th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jennifer Beck (R, Red Bank) and in the General Assembly by Mary Pat Angelini (R, Ocean Township, Monmouth County) and Caroline Casagrande (R, Colts Neck Township).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[50] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[52] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[53] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[54] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[55][56] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[57] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[58] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 12,196 registered voters in Tinton Falls, of which 3,425 (28.1%) were registered as Democrats, 2,731 (22.4%) were registered as Republicans and 6,033 (49.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[60]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 51.9% of the vote here (5,065 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 45.9% (4,483 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (104 votes), among the 9,763 ballots cast by the borough's 12,498 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.1%.[61] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 50.7% of the vote here (4,476 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 48.0% (4,236 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (72 votes), among the 8,825 ballots cast by the borough's 11,432 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.2.[62]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 56.9% of the vote here (3,740 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 35.1% (2,307 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.6% (437 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (51 votes), among the 6,576 ballots cast by the borough's 12,354 registered voters, yielding a 53.2% turnout.[63]

Fire departments[edit]

Tinton Falls is covered by four fire companies, split into two fire districts.[64] Wayside Fire Company (36-2), founded in 1919,[65] and Pinebrook Fire Company (36-3) are in Fire District 1.[66] Tinton Falls Fire Company No. 1 (36-1), established in 1932,[67] and Northside Engine Company (36-4), founded in 1955,[68] which make up Fire District 2.[69]

Education[edit]

Public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the three schools in the Tinton Falls School District, together with students from the neighboring community of Shrewsbury Township and the dependent children of military families based at Naval Weapons Station Earle.[70] All three of the district's schools are located in Tinton Falls. Shrewsbury Township is represented with one seat out of nine on the district's board of education.[71] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,553 students and 130.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.88:1.[72] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[73]) are Mahala F. Atchison Elementary School[74] (Grades K-3, 665 students), Swimming River Elementary School[75] (Grades 4-5, 352 students) and Tinton Falls Middle School[76] (Grades 6-8, 536 students).[77]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Monmouth Regional High School, located in Tinton Falls. The school serves students from Eatontown, Shrewsbury Township, Tinton Falls, and Naval Weapons Station Earle.[78] As of the 2011-12 school year, the school served 1,008 students.[79] Students may also apply to attend one of the magnet schools in the Monmouth County Vocational School DistrictMarine Academy of Science and Technology, Academy of Allied Health & Science, High Technology High School, Biotechnology High School, and Communications High School.[80]

Ranney School is a coeducational, nonsectarian K-12 private school founded in 1960, and its campus occupies 60 acres (240,000 m2) off of Hope Road.[81]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 96.93 miles (155.99 km) of roadways, of which 65.99 miles (106.20 km) are maintained by the municipality, 17.77 miles (28.60 km) by Monmouth County, 4.22 miles (6.79 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 8.95 miles (14.40 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[82]

Passing through Tinton Falls are the Garden State Parkway,[83] Route 18,[84] Route 33,[85] and Route 66.[86] Tinton Falls houses exits 100 (including the Monmouth Service Area), 102, 105, and 109 on the parkway, including a high-speed toll gate, and the southern start/end of the express and local carriageways, although the borough is listed only on signs for exit 105.[22][83][87]

Major county roads that pass through Tinton Falls are County Route 537 (Tinton Avenue) which crosses the northern portion of the borough from Colts Neck Township in the west to Eatontown in the east,[88] and County Route 547 (Shafto Road), which enters from Wall Township at the borough's southwest corner and proceeds northeast towards Eatontown.[89]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers train service on the North Jersey Coast Line at the Red Bank. NJ Transit local bus service is available on the 833 and 836 routes.[90]

Points of interest[edit]

The Jersey Shore Premium Outlets in Tinton Falls opened in 2008
The waterfall of Tinton Falls
  • Old Mill at Tinton Falls - constructed in 1676, the site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.[91][92]
  • Frozen Ropes, a baseball training center.[93]
  • Twin Brook Golf Center, a public 9-hole golf course, 18-hole minigolf course, and driving range.[94]
  • Jersey Shore Premium Outlets, an outdoor shopping mall that opened in November 2008 with 120 outlet stores and a food court, offering a gross leasable area of 435,000 square feet (40,400 m2).[95][96]
  • Tinton Falls Library, one of the branches part of the Monmouth County Library System. Established in 1961 as the New Shrewsbury Public Library Association, the name was changed to its current title in 1975.[97]
  • Overlook by the Falls, located near the town's waterfalls (the namesake for the town) and wildlife area, where trails have been added to allow visitors to view the falls and wildlife.[98]
  • Borough parks include Hockhockson Park, with three baseball fields and basketball courts,[99] Liberty II Park, with two football fields, a softball field and basketball courts,[100] Riverdale West Park, with two soccer fields and a basketball court[101] and the Sycamore Recreation Complex, which offers six lighted multi-purpose fields,[102] among the borough's other parks and recreation facilities.[103]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Tinton Falls include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ Office of the Mayor, Borough of Tinton Falls. Accessed June 5, 2014.
  4. ^ Administration, Borough of Tinton Falls. Accessed June 5, 2014.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Tinton Falls. Accessed June 5, 2014.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Tinton Falls, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Tinton Falls borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Tinton Falls borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Tinton Falls, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Tinton Falls, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 183. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  21. ^ Tinton Fall Records, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed November 9, 2012. "New Shrewsbury was established out of Shrewsbury in 1950 and renamed Tinton Falls in 1975 to avoid postal delivery errors."
  22. ^ a b Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Tinton Falls, N.J.; An Old Area That Has Bloomed Lately", The New York Times, July 22, 2001. Accessed August 9, 2012. "The split left the old Shrewsbury Township with just the three streets that held the high-density housing. And the sparsely populated breakaway borough adopted the name New Shrewsbury, which it changed to Tinton Falls in 1975 to eliminate postal confusion."
  23. ^ a b c James S. Brown (1976). William A. Barrett, ed. Historical Scrapbook of Tinton Falls, New Jersey. The Tinton Falls Bicentennial Committee. pp. 5–9. 
  24. ^ a b Harry B. Weiss and Howard R. Kemble (1976). Historical Scrapbook of Tinton Falls, New Jersey. The Tinton Falls Bicentennial Committee. pp. 31–36. 
  25. ^ a b Randall Gabrielan (1999). The American Century Series: Tinton Falls in the Twentieth Century. Arcadia. 
  26. ^ William A. Barrett, ed. (1976). Historical Scrapbook of Tinton Falls, New Jersey. The Tinton Falls Bicentennial Committee. 
  27. ^ Edmund Constantini (1998). Know Your Town: Tinton Falls. The League of Women Voters, Greater Red Bank Area. 
  28. ^ Phalon, Richard. "Towns Act to End A Mixup on Names; Towns Seek to End Mixup Over Towns", The New York Times, April 20, 1975. Accessed October 28, 2013. "What's in a name? Confusion, if you happen to live in the Monmouth County community of New Shrewsbury (as distinguished from neighboring Shrewsbury Township and the Borough of Shrewsbury) or in the Ocean County community of Dover Township (as destinguished from, Dover, which is in Morris County, well to the north)."
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Tinton Falls borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Tinton Falls borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Tinton Falls borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  33. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  34. ^ Government Overview, Borough of Tinton Falls. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  35. ^ Walter, Kenny. "Tinton Falls elections will be moved to fall; Boro cites cost savings, higher voter turnout", The Hub, June 3, 2010. Accessed October 28, 2013. "In a move that is expected to eventually save close to $100,000 and boost voter turnout, the Tinton Falls Borough Council agreed to move the municipal election date to coincide with the fall general election. By a 4-1 vote at the May 18 meeting, the council adopted an ordinance that will move the nonpartisan spring municipal election to November beginning in 2011."
  36. ^ Office of the Mayor, Borough of Tinton Falls. Accessed June 5, 2014.
  37. ^ Borough Council Members, Borough of Tinton Falls. Accessed June 5, 2014.
  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 27, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  58. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  59. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  60. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  61. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 11, 2012.
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  63. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  64. ^ Fire District 1 & Fire District 2, Tinton Falls, New Jersey. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  65. ^ About Us, Wayside Fire Company. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  66. ^ Fire District 1, Tinton Falls, New Jersey. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  67. ^ History, Tinton Falls Fire Company No. 1. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  68. ^ Northside at the Beginning, Northside Engine Company No. 4. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  69. ^ Fire District 2, Tinton Falls, New Jersey. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  70. ^ DeNicola, linda. "Boro grapples with issue of educating military kidsSchool district says agreement was for Navy dependents only", Atlanticville, February 15, 2007. Accessed October 28, 2013. "Whether or not the Tinton Falls School District is obligated to educate all children living at Naval Weapons Station Earle in Colts Neck, is expected to be an issue with ramifications for taxpayers in the borough school district.... The resolution states that the education of non-Navy dependent children who will remain at NWS Earle for several more years, as well as additional non-Navy dependent children who will reside at NWS Earle in the future, was never contemplated in the 1988 agreement and is an unfair tax burden to the taxpayers of the Borough of Tinton Falls and the Township of Shrewsbury."
  71. ^ Home page, Shrewsbury Township. Accessed October 28, 2013. "Public school students in grades K through 8 attend the three schools in the Tinton Falls School District. The district is a regional district that also serves students from the neighboring community of Tinton Falls. Shrewsbury Township is represented with one seat out of nine on the district's board of education."
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