Tiregān

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"Tirgan" redirects here. For the village in Iran, see Tirgan, Iran.

Tiregân (Persian: تیرگان‎) also known as Jashn-e Tiregân (Persian: جشن تیرگان‎) ('The feast of Tiregan) is an ancient Iranian festival coinciding with the mid summer festivals.

Overview[edit]

Tirgan 2010 in Kooshk Varjavand, Tehran

The feast of Tiregan is an ancient Iranian celebration, which is still celebrated among Iranian Zoroastrians, Parsis of India and some Iranian Muslims in various parts of Iran, including Mazandaran and Arak provinces.[1][2][3] The celebration is widely attested by historians such as Abu Saʿīd Gardēzī, Biruni and Al-Masudi, as well as European travellers to Iran during the Safavid era. This event is celebrated on the 13th day of the month of Tir, (the 4th month of the Persian calendar) which equates to the 2nd or 3 July in the Gregorian Calendar. The celebration is experiencing a resurgence amongst Iranians. Today, some Iranians celebrate this occasion with dancing, singing, reciting poetry and serving spinach soup and sholeh zard. It has also been observed that during this celebration children and adults rejoice by swimming in streams and splashing water on each other. The custom of tying rainbow-colored bands on their wrists, which are worn for ten days and then thrown into a stream, is also a way to rejoice for children.

Theme of the Festival[edit]

This event is celebrated on the 13th day of the month of Tir, (the 4th month of the Persian calendar) which equates to the 2nd or 3 July in the Gregorian Calendar and refers to the archangel Tir (arrow) or Tishtar (lightning bolt) who appeared in the sky to generate thunder and lightning for much needed rain. Legend says that Arash Kamangir Amoli was a man chosen to settle a land dispute between the leaders of two lands, Iran and Turan. Arash was to loose his arrow on the 13th day of Tir and where the arrow landed, would lie the border between the two kingdoms. Turan - which had suffered from the lack of rain - and Iran rejoiced at the settlement of the borders, then rain poured onto the two countries and there was peace between them.

Celebrations in various regions of Iran[edit]

In Mazandaran, where Arash is supposed to have come from, and in Farahan people go to a river, play traditional music, and splash water on each other. Amongst Zoroastrians, it is a celebration of both religious value as well as a joyous occasion.

Description from historical sources[edit]

Abu Rayhan Biruni,[4] in the section "On the festivals of the month of Persians" in the chrnology states that :

Another Iranian Muslim historian, Abu Sa'id Gardizi has given a similar description to Biruni. He notes however that the arrow of Arash fell in the area of Farghana and Tokharistan.[5]

See also[edit]

  • Tirgan Festival
  • C. Eduard Sachau (trans.), The Chronology of Ancient Nations: An English Version of the Arabic Text of the Athâr-ul-Bâkiya of Albîrûnî, or 'Vestiges of the Past', Collected and Reduced ... by the Author in A. H. 390 - 1, A. D. 1000 (1879). Google books link.[6]
  • Garzidi, Biruni, Masu'di.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ [1] (report on celebrations in Farahan)
  2. ^ [2] another report on the celebrations in Arak province
  3. ^ [3] celebrations in Mazandaran
  4. ^ C. Eduard Sachau (trans.), The Chronology of Ancient Nations: An English Version of the Arabic Text of the Athâr-ul-Bâkiya of Albîrûnî, or 'Vestiges of the Past', Collected and Reduced ... by the Author in A. H. 390 - 1, A. D. 1000 (1879). Google books link [4]. Note the book was translated in 1879 and copy right has expired. Quote taken from pages 205-206.
  5. ^ Tārīkh-i Gardīzī / taʾlīf, Abū Saʻīd ʻAbd al-Ḥayy ibn Zahāk ibn Maḥmūd Gardīzī ; bih taṣḥīḥ va taḥshiyah va taʻlīq, ʻAbd al-Ḥayy Ḥabībī. Tihrān : Dunyā-yi Kitāb, 1363 [1984 or 1985]. excerpt from page 520.
  6. ^ "The Chronology of Ancient Nations: An English Version of the Arabic Text of ... - Muḥammad ibn Aḥmad Bīrūnī - Google Books". Books.google.com. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 

External links[edit]