Titanium(II) oxide

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Titanium(II) oxide
Titanium(II) oxide
Identifiers
CAS number 12137-20-1 YesY
PubChem 61685
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula TiO
Molar mass 63.866 g/mol
Appearance bronze crystals
Density 4.95 g/cm3
Melting point 1750 °C
Structure
Crystal structure cubic
Hazards
EU Index Not listed
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Related titanium oxides Titanium(III) oxide
Titanium(III,IV) oxide
Titanium(IV) oxide
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

Titanium(II) oxide (TiO) is an inorganic chemical compound of titanium and oxygen. It can be prepared from titanium dioxide and titanium metal at 1500 °C.[1] It is non-stoichiometric in a range TiO0.7 to TiO1.3 and this is caused by vacancies of either Ti or O in the defect rock salt structure.[1] In pure TiO 15% of both Ti and O sites are vacant.[1] Careful annealing can cause ordering of the vacancies producing a monoclinic form which has 5 TiO units in the primitive cell that exhibits higher resistivity.[2] A high temperature form with titanium atoms with trigonal prismatic coordination is also known.[3] Acid solutions of TiO are stable for a short time then decompose to give hydrogen:[1]

Ti2+ + H+ → Ti3+ + ½ H2

Evidence has been obtained for the presence of the diatomic molecule TiO in the interstellar medium.[4] TiO shows strong bands in the optical spectra of cool (M-type) stars.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Holleman, A. F.; Wiberg, E. (2001), Inorganic Chemistry, San Diego: Academic Press, ISBN 0-12-352651-5 
  2. ^ Electrical and Magnetic Properties of TiO and VO, Banus M. D., Reed T. B., Strauss A. J., Phys. Rev. B 5, 2775 - 2784, (1972)doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.5.2775
  3. ^ Greenwood, Norman N.; Earnshaw, Alan (1997). Chemistry of the Elements (2nd ed.). Butterworth-Heinemann. ISBN 0080379419. 
  4. ^ Dyck, H. M.; Nordgren, Tyler E. "The effect of TiO absorption on optical and infrared angular diameters of cool stars" Astronomical Journal (2002), 124(1), 541-545. doi:10.1086/341039
  5. ^ http://www.stsci.edu/~inr/ldwarf.html