Tizoc

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This article is about the Aztec ruler. For the Mexican film, see Tizoc (film). For the Fatal Fury character, see List of Fatal Fury characters#Tizoc.
Tizoc
7th Tlatoani of Tenochtitlan
Ruler of the Aztec Triple Alliance
Tizoc.jpg
Reign 1481–1486
Titles Tlacateccatl
Died 1486
Predecessor Axayacatl
Successor Ahuitzotl
Father Tezozomoc
Mother Atotoztli II

Tizocic [tiˈsosik] or Tizocicatzin [tisosiˈkat͡sin] (the honorific form of his name), usually known in English as Tizoc, was the seventh tlatoani of Tenochtitlan.

Biography[edit]

Family[edit]

Tizoc was a son of the Princess Atotoztli II and her cousin, prince Tezozomoc. He was a grandson of the Emperors Moctezuma I and Itzcoatl. He was a descendant of the King Cuauhtototzin.

He was a successor of his brother Axayacatl and his other brother was Emperor Ahuitzotl and his sister was the Queen Chalchiuhnenetzin. He was an uncle of Emperors Cuauhtémoc, Moctezuma II and Cuitláhuac and grandfather of Diego de San Francisco Tehuetzquititzin.

Reign[edit]

Most sources agree that Tizoc took power in 1481 (the Aztec year "2 House"), succeeding his older brother. Although Tízoc's reign was relatively short, he began the rebuilding of the Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan (a task completed by his younger brother in 1487), and also put down a rebellion of the Matlatzincan peoples of the Toluca Valley.

According to the Codex Mendoza, during Tizoc's reign the altepetls of Tonalimoquetzayan, Toxico, Ecatepec, Cillán, Tecaxic, Tolocan, Yancuitlan, Tlappan, Atezcahuacan, Mazatlán, Xochiyetla, Tamapachco, Ecatliquapechco and Miquetlan were conquered.

Map showing the expansion of the Aztec empire showing the areas conquered by the Aztec rulers. The conquests of Tízoc is marked by the colour orange.[1]

Death[edit]

Tizoc died in 1486, though it's still somewhat unclear how. Some sources suggest that he was poisoned, others that he was the victim of "sorcery" or illness.

It has been suggested that either Tlacaelel or other members of the royal family (especially Ahuitzotl) were responsible for the poisoning of Tizoc.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Based on the maps by Hassig (1988)

References[edit]

  • Townsend, Richard F. (2000) The Aztecs. revised ed. Thames and Hudson, New York.
  • Hassig, Ross (1988) Aztec Warfare: Imperial Expansion and Political Control. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.
  • Weaver, Muriel Porter (1993). The Aztecs, Maya, and Their Predecessors: Archaeology of Mesoamerica (3rd ed. ed.). San Diego: Academic Press. ISBN 0-01-263999-0. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Axayacatl
Tlatoani of Tenochtitlan
1481–1486
Succeeded by
Ahuitzotl