To Ramona

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"To Ramona"
Song by Bob Dylan from the album Another Side of Bob Dylan
Released August 8, 1964
Recorded June 9, 1964
Genre Folk
Label Columbia Records
Writer Bob Dylan
Composer Bob Dylan
Producer Tom Wilson
Another Side of Bob Dylan track listing

"To Ramona" is a folk waltz written by Bob Dylan for his fourth studio album, Another Side of Bob Dylan. The melody is taken from traditional Mexican folk music. The song is one of the many on the album to highlight the more personal, and less political, side of Dylan's songwriting that would become evermore prominent in the future. The song also makes many allusions to Dylan's personal relationship with fellow folk singer Joan Baez,[1] at the time of its composition and subsequent release. It is another example of the G, G6, G7 harmonic motif Dylan uses pervasively on the record.

British R&B pianist Alan Price (ex-The Animals) recorded a piano and vocal solo cover of To Ramona on his 1966 album A Price On His Head,

A cover version of the song was recorded by The Flying Burrito Brothers on their 1971 self-titled album; this version is featured in the film Scott Pilgrim vs. the World,[2] which itself features a central character called Ramona Flowers. The influence of the song on the character's creation is indicated by an inter-title (chapter heading in the comic series) quoting the song's opening lyrics "Ramona, come closer".

Irish singer Sinéad Lohan recorded a version of "To Ramona" in 1996. This was released on a compilation album, The Loving Time.

Philadelphia indie rock band Days Away covered "To Ramona" for Listen to Bob Dylan: A Tribute.

British songwriter David Gray released a live version of "To Ramona" on his live cover album A Thousand Miles Behind (2007).

U.S. band These United States released their cover version on French album Dylan mania published by Naïve Records (2009)

In 1992 the Texas Tornados in their album Hangin' on by Thread made a version of "To Ramona" with lyrics partially translated and adapted into Spanish.

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