To You Sweetheart, Aloha

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To You Sweetheart, Aloha
Studio album by Andy Williams
Released 1959
Recorded November 3, 1958
November 7, 1958
April 29, 1959
April 30, 1959
May 4, 1959[1]
Genre Early pop/rock
Vocal pop
Traditional pop
Standards
Soft rock[2]
Length 27:59
Label Cadence Records
Andy Williams chronology
Two Time Winners
(1959)
To You Sweetheart, Aloha
(1959)
Lonely Street
(1959)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[2]
Billboard 4/5 stars[3]

To You Sweetheart, Aloha is an album by American pop singer Andy Williams that was released late in the summer of 1959 by Cadence Records.[3] This, his fourth LP for the label, has a Hawaiian theme that coincides with the admission of the 50th of the United States. The album was reissued with the title The Hawaiian Wedding Song in 1965 by Columbia Records and entered the Top LP's chart in Billboard magazine's May 22 issue that year and reached number 61 during its 18 weeks there.[4]

One of the songs on this album, "Hawaiian Wedding Song", was originally recorded and released as a single in 1958 and stayed on the pop chart for 20 weeks, peaking at number 11.[5] It was included on his last album, Two Time Winners, as were two other songs from this album, "Blue Hawaii" and "Sweet Leilani". Both of those songs, however, were rerecorded for this album while the hit single was not.

The album was released on compact disc for the first time as one of two albums on one CD by Collectables Records on September 12, 2000, the other album being a 1962 Cadence compilation entitled Million Seller Songs.[6] Collectables included this CD in a box set entitled Classic Album Collection, Vol. 1, which contains 17 of his studio albums and three compilations and was released on June 26, 2001.[7] The album was also released on compact disc with four bonus tracks after being digitally remastered by Varèse Sarabande in 2001.[8] Three of those four ("Blue Hawaii", "Sweet Leilani", and "Love Letters in the Sand") were recorded for the Two Time Winners album, and the fourth ("House of Bamboo") was the B-side of "Hawaiian Wedding Song".[9]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "To You Sweetheart, Aloha" (Harry Owens) - 2:50
  2. "Blue Hawaii" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) - 1:59
  3. "I'll Weave a Lei of Stars for You" (Robert Alexander Anderson, Harry Owens) - 2:18
  4. "Sweet Leilani" (Harry Owens) - 2:34
  5. "Moon of Manakoora" (Frank Loesser, Alfred Newman) - 2:48
  6. "The Hawaiian Wedding Song" (Al Hoffman, Charles E. King, Dick Manning) - 2:29
  7. "Song of the Islands" (Charles E. King) - 2:21
  8. "A Song of Old Hawaii" (Gordon Beecher, Johnny Noble) - 2:32
  9. "Love Song of Kalua" (Ken Darby) - 2:23
  10. "Beyond the Reef" (Jack Pitman) - 3:05
  11. "Ka-Lu-A" (Anne Caldwell, Jerome Kern) - 2:34
  12. "Aloha ‘Oe (Farewell to Thee)" (Liliuokalani) - 2:25

CD Bonus Tracks[edit]

  1. "Blue Hawaii" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) - 2:03
  2. "Sweet Leilani" (Harry Owens) - 2:22
  3. "Love Letters in the Sand" (J. Fred Coots, Charles Kenny, Nick Kenny) - 2:32
  4. "House of Bamboo" (William Crompton, Norman Murrells) - 2:06

Grammy nomination[edit]

The single "Hawaiian Wedding Song" brought the first of six Grammy nominations that Williams received over the course of his career, this time in the category for Best Vocal Performance, Male. The winner was Perry Como for "Catch a Falling Star".[10]

Song information[edit]

"Ka-Lu-A" originated in the 1921 musical Good Morning, Dearie[11] and reached number three on the charts the following year as a duet between Elsie Baker (who was credited as Edna Brown) and Elliott Shaw.[12] "Aloha ‘Oe (Farewell to Thee)" charted for one week at number 10 as an instrumental recording by Ferera's Hawaiian Instrumental Quintet in 1924.[13]

"Song of the Islands" first charted as an instrumental recording by Wayne King & His Orchestra that peaked at number 12 in 1930,[14] and then as a vocal performance by Bing Crosby in 1936 that got as high as number 14.[15] Crosby's recording of "The Moon of Manakoora" debuted on the charts in February 1938 and eventually made it to number 10,[16] and a rendition of the song by Ray Noble & His Orchestra with Tony Martin on vocal came onto the charts that March and reached number 15.[17]

Dick Todd entered the charts with "To You Sweetheart, Aloha" in 1940 and got as high as number 10.[18] Crosby's recording of "Beyond the Reef" reached number 26 on Billboard magazine's list of the Most Played Juke Box Records in 1950.[19] And as of the release of To You Sweetheart, Aloha, "A Song of Old Hawaii" had already been recorded by Bing Crosby,[20] Dorothy Lamour,[21] and Tony Martin.[22]

Personnel[edit]

Original album[edit]

Varèse Sarabande reissue[9][edit]

  • Cary Mansfield – producer
  • Marty Wekser – producer; mastering
  • Evren Goknar – mastering
  • Joseph Lanza – liner notes
  • Bill Pitzonka – art direction & design
  • Greg Yantek – additional photo courtesy

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Cadence Era: "Canadian Sunset" brightens Andy's disk career". Billboard. 1967-11-11. pp. AW–22. 
  2. ^ a b "To You Sweetheart, Aloha – Andy Williams". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 11 June 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Reviews of This Week's LP's". Billboard. 1959-09-14. p. 44. 
  4. ^ Whitburn 2010, p. 844.
  5. ^ Whitburn 2009, p. 1059.
  6. ^ "Million Seller Songs/To You Sweetheart, Aloha — Andy Williams". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 11 June 2011. 
  7. ^ "Classic Album Collection, Vol. 1 - Andy Williams". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 6 May 2011. 
  8. ^ "To You Sweetheart, Aloha (Bonus Tracks) - Andy Williams". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 11 June 2011. 
  9. ^ a b (2001) Album reissue notes for To You Sweetheart, Aloha by Andy Williams [CD booklet]. Studio City: Varèse Sarabande.
  10. ^ O'Neil 1999, p. 28.
  11. ^ "Songs from the 1921 stage production "Good Morning, Dearie" at the Globe, New York". the database of popular music. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  12. ^ Whitburn 1986, p. 43.
  13. ^ Whitburn 1986, p. 155.
  14. ^ Whitburn 1986, p. 257.
  15. ^ Whitburn 1986, p. 105.
  16. ^ Whitburn 1986, p. 106.
  17. ^ Whitburn 1986, p. 337.
  18. ^ Whitburn 1986, p. 421.
  19. ^ Whitburn 1994, p. 39.
  20. ^ "Blue Hawaii – Bing Crosby". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 12 June 2011. 
  21. ^ "Queen of the Hollywood Islands – Dorothy Lamour". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  22. ^ "This May Be the Night – Tony Martin". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  23. ^ (1959) To You Sweetheart, Aloha by Andy Williams [album jacket]. New York: Cadence Records CLP 25029.

References[edit]

  • O'Neil, Thomas (1999), The Grammys, Perigree Books, ISBN 0-399-52477-0 
  • Whitburn, Joel (1986), Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories, 1890-1954, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0-89820-083-0 
  • Whitburn, Joel (1994), Joel Whitburn's Pop Hits, 1940-1954, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0-89820-106-3 
  • Whitburn, Joel (2009), Joel Whitburn's Top Pop Singles, 1955-2008, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0-89820-180-2 
  • Whitburn, Joel (2010), Joel Whitburn Presents Top Pop Albums, Seventh Edition, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0-89820-183-7 

External links[edit]

To You Sweetheart, Aloha - Andy Williams Review with music samples. allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 10 January 2012.