To amend the National Law Enforcement Museum Act to extend the termination date (H.R. 4120; 113th Congress)

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Great Seal of the United States
Full title To amend the National Law Enforcement Museum Act to extend the termination date.
Introduced in 113th United States Congress
Introduced on February 28, 2014
Sponsored by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer (D, MD-5)
Number of Co-Sponsors 1
Citations
Public Law Pub.L. 113–102
Legislative history

Pub.L. 113–102 (formerly H.R. 4120) is a United States Public Law that extends until November 9, 2016, the authority of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, a nonprofit organization, to construct a museum on federal lands within the District of Columbia honoring law enforcement officers.[1] The museum would "honor federal, state, and local law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty."[2]

The law was introduced the United States House of Representatives and became Public Law 113-102 during the 113th United States Congress.

Background[edit]

In 2000, the United States Congress authorized the establishment of the National Law Enforcement Museum, to tell the story of law enforcement in the United States. Stories of the fallen will be featured in the Museum's "Hall of Remembrance." The bill, signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 9, 2000, authorized the planning for the museum. The National Law Enforcement Museum will be mostly-underground and located adjacent to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC's Judiciary Square (400 block of E Street, NW). The Museum will tell the story of American law enforcement through high-tech interactive exhibits, historical and contemporary artifact collections, a dedicated space for research, and diverse educational programming. The public review process to authorize construction at the site took five years.[3] On October 14, 2010, Attorney General Eric Holder, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and others broke ground on the construction of the museum.[3] As of October 2012, over $58 million in private donations have been raised.[3]

Provisions of the bill[edit]

This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Research Service, a public domain source.[4]

The bill would amend the National Law Enforcement Museum Act to extend by three years the authority to construct the National Law Enforcement Museum.[4]

Congressional Budget Office report[edit]

This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Budget Office, as ordered reported by the House Committee on Natural Resources on April 9, 2014. This is a public domain source.[1]

H.R. 4120 would extend until November 9, 2016, the authority of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, a nonprofit organization, to construct a museum on federal lands within the District of Columbia honoring law enforcement officers. The authorization to construct the museum expired on November 9, 2013. Because the museum would be established with nonfederal funds, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that enacting H.R. 4120 would have no significant effect on the federal budget. Enacting H.R. 4120 would not affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.[1]

H.R. 4120 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.[1]

Procedural history[edit]

H.R. 4120 was introduced into the United States House of Representatives on February 28, 2014 by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer (D, MD-5).[5] The bill was referred to the United States House Committee on Natural Resources and the United States House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation. It was reported by the committee on April 28, 2014, alongside House Report 113-421.[5] On April 28, 2014, the House voted in Roll Call Vote 179 to pass the bill 384-0.[5][2] On May 5, 2014, the United States Senate voted by unanimous consent to pass the bill. President Barack Obama signed it into law on May 16, 2014.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "CBO - H.R. 4120". Congressional Budget Office. Retrieved 28 April 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Marcos, Cristina (28 April 2014). "House votes to allow more DC penthouses". The Hill. Retrieved 1 May 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c Trescott, Jaqueline (October 15, 2010). "Law enforcement museum is on track". Washington Post. p. C5. 
  4. ^ a b "H.R. 4120 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 30 April 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c "H.R. 4120 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 30 April 2014. 

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Government.