Tocopheryl acetate

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Tocopheryl acetate
Tocopheryl acetate.png
Tocopheryl acetate 3d structure.png
Identifiers
CAS number 58-95-7 YesY
PubChem 86472
ChemSpider 77987 YesY
UNII A7E6112E4N YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL1047 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C31H52O3
Molar mass 472.743 g/mol
Hazards
NFPA 704
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g., canola oil Health code 1: Exposure would cause irritation but only minor residual injury. E.g., turpentine Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 YesY (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Infobox references

Tocopheryl acetate, also known as vitamin E acetate, is a common vitamin supplement with the molecular formula C31H52O3 (for 'α' form). It is the ester of acetic acid and tocopherol (vitamin E). It is often used in dermatological products such as skin creams. Tocopheryl acetate is not oxidized and can penetrate through the skin to the living cells, where about 5% is converted to free tocopherol and provides beneficial antioxidant effects.[1]

Tocopheryl acetate is used as an alternative to tocopherol itself because the phenolic hydroxyl group is blocked, providing a less acidic product with a longer shelf life. It is believed that the acetate is slowly hydrolyzed once it is absorbed into the skin, regenerating tocopherol and providing protection against the sun's ultraviolet rays.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Linus Pauling Institute Research Report: All About E
  2. ^ Beijersbergen van Henegouwen G, Junginger H, de Vries H (1995). "Hydrolysis of RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E acetate) in the skin and its UV protecting activity (an in vivo study with the rat)". J Photochem Photobiol B 29 (1): 45–51. doi:10.1016/1011-1344(95)90251-1. PMID 7472802.