Tod Morgan

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Albert Morgan Pilkington, better known as "Tod Morgan," (December 25, 1902 – August 3, 1953), was an American boxer.

Background[edit]

According to the April 7, 1927 Spokane Spokesman-Review, Morgan was born in Dungeness, WA--which is adjacent to Sequim. Dungeness is now a ghost town.

Per an August 19, 1923 Seattle Daily Times newspaper article, Morgan's first bout occurred in Concrete, Washington. His second occurred at Anacortes, Washington, and his opponent was Pete Moe. He then headed south to California with his stepfather Fred Morgan, who had been born in Oregon.

After they arrived in Eureka, California, Fred put Tod in boxing merely as a means of getting some strength into his body. According to the April 3, 1929 Seattle Daily Times, Fred began training him in the backroom of the Hoffman House in Vallejo, a soft-drink parlor and lunch room (this was during Prohibition). Fred had no intention of his son ever becoming a professional fighter, let alone a world champion. But Tod liked it so much that he began boxing professionally. On April 6, 1927, local newspapers reported that Fred Morgan had been found dead in a motor boat near Port Angeles, Washington. It was believed that a leak in the boat's exhaust pipe resulted in his death while he had slept. Tod took a break from boxing during this period.

On February 15, 1929, in Seattle, Tod adopted Billie, the four-year-old son of Mrs. Morgan (formerly of Arcata, California).

According to the December 24, 1942 Portland Oregonian, Morgan served in the Australian Army, fighting in Africa. He later returned to the United States and worked as a referee and a bellboy in hotels before he became ill in 1953 and died. He was survived by his widow Grace, and his mother Ms. Minta Pilkington of Reno, Nevada.

Professional career[edit]

Morgan turned professional in 1920 and captured the National Boxing Association World Super Featherweight Title with a win over Mike Ballerino in 1925. He lost the belt in 1929 when he was KO'd by Benny Bass. He retired in 1942 after fighting for years in Australia.

External links[edit]