Todd B. Hawley

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Todd B. Hawley
Nationality  United States
Known for Founder of the International Space University

Todd B. Hawley (April 13, 1961–July 11, 1995) was one of the three founders of the International Space University (ISU) and a lifelong advocate of human space exploration. He was born on April 13, 1961, the day after the flight of the first human to go into space Yuri Gagarin.

Career[edit]

Todd Hawley attended George Washington University, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Russian Studies and Economics and his Master of Arts degree in Space Policy.[1]

While an undergraduate, Mr. Hawley started the local chapter of Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) and later became the Chairman of SEDS (1983 - 1985). With Peter Diamandis and Bob Richards, he founded the Space Generation Foundation and served as its first executive director.

Mr. Hawley conducted extensive research on solar power satellites. He received the 1989 Space Industrialization Fellowship Award, the 1988 Aviation Week and Space Technology Laurel, the 1993 Space Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award, and the 1995 K. E. Tsiolkovsky Medal.

International Space University[edit]

"A founder of the International Space University (ISU), Todd Hawley served as the university's first chief executive officer and as a faculty member in the Space Humanities Department. He successfully managed ISU from a start-up organization to a global enterprise. ... He received the 1989 Space Industrialization Fellowship Award, the 1988 Aviation Week and Space Technology Laurel, the 1993 Space Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award, and the 1995 K. E. Tsiolkovsky Medal." [2]

References[edit]