Todd A. Batchelor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Todd Batchelor)
Jump to: navigation, search
Todd A. Batchelor
Republican nominee for
United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2004
Opponent(s) Primary:
Whit Whitfield (R)
General:
David Price (D)
Thomas Hill (L)
Incumbent David Price
Personal details
Born Holly Springs, North Carolina
Political party Republican
Residence Raleigh, North Carolina
Alma mater University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Profession Political Consultant
Religion Baptist
Military service
Service/branch United States Navy seal United States Navy
Years of service 1989–1993

Todd A. Batchelor is an American businessman and political figure from North Carolina. He was the Republican Party nominee for North Carolina's 4th congressional district seat held by Democrat David Price in the 2004 U.S. House election.

A veteran of the United States Navy, Batchelor earned his undergraduate degree in history from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington in 1996. A native of Holly Springs, Batchelor has been active with the Wake County, North Carolina Republican Party and has served as a county library commissioner. He defeated challenger Whit Whitfield and two other candidates in a contested Republican primary, in what was described as a "shocking upset."[1]

Batchelor's campaign had centered on his support for Bush administration policies, specifically the Iraq War and middle-class tax cuts, as well as opposition to the federally subsidized Triangle Transit Authority light rail system.

Batchelor served as the finance director for the North Carolina Republican Party from 2006 to 2009. Since 2010, Batchelor has served as a staffer in the North Carolina General Assembly, including stints as Sergeant-at-arms, and Legislative Chief of Staff to Rep. David R. Lewis of Dunn, North Carolina. He unsuccessfully sought a seat in the North Carolina House of Representatives in 2010, losing the primary election to Morrisville Town Councilman Tom Murry.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "North Carolina Decides: Late Primary With Low Turnout", American Daily, July 29, 2004

External links[edit]