Todd May

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Todd May (born 1955 in New York City, New York) is a political philosopher notable for his role in developing, alongside Saul Newman and Lewis Call, the theory of post-structuralist anarchism.[1] He is currently Class of 1941 Memorial Professor of Philosophy at Clemson University and contributes to CounterPunch. His 1994 book The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism was the first to combine poststructuralist and anarchist thought, and he subsequently has published treatments of major poststructuralist philosophers, including Gilles Deleuze and Michel Foucault. He serves as faculty adviser for several student-run political organizations.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Between Genealogy and Epistemology (1993). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-00905-6.
  • The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism (1994). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-01046-5.
  • Reconsidering Difference (1997). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-01658-0.
  • Our Practices, Our Selves, or, What It Means to Be Human (2001). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-02086-0.
  • Operation Defensive Shield (2003). Sydney: Pluto Press. ISBN 978-0-7453-2063-2. Written in collaboration with Muna Hamzeh.
  • The Moral Theory of Poststructuralism (2004). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-02585-8.
  • Gilles Deleuze (2005). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-84309-6.
  • Philosophy of Foucault (2006). Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press. ISBN 978-0-7735-3169-7.
  • The Political Thought of Jacques Ranciere: Creating Equality (2008). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. ISBN 978-0-7486-3586-3.
  • Death (2008). Acumen Publishing. ISBN 1-84465-164-9.

References[edit]

  1. ^ May prefers this term to the more widely used "postanarchism", given the latter's connotation of a philosophy that is "after" or has transcended classical anarchism.

External links[edit]

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/22/the-weight-of-the-past/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=1#more-151111