Toe wrestling

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Toe wrestling is a sport involving two opponents who lock feet and attempt to pin the other's foot down.

History[edit]

The game was invented by four drinkers in Ye Olde Royal Oak Inn in Wetton in 1974, who were bemoaning the fact that the United Kingdom struggled to produce any world champions. Logically, if a new sport was invented that no one else knew about, the country could boast a champion at last. Having tried "ear wrestling" and "push of war" (with a scaffolding pole), Pete Cheetham, Eddie Stansfield, Pete Dean and Mick Dawson created toe wrestling. A rule board was produced by the sign writers at the Yorkshire Evening Post. (Mick's girlfriend, Angie Edward, had a father who was the editor.) A small trophy was made and engraved.

Mick became the first world champion, retaining the title the next year in 1975; however, in 1976, a Canadian visitor competed and won. The point of the sport being gone, the event was discontinued for a long period. Now the sport is gaining popularity, and although the Olympic committee refused to acknowledge it, the World Toe Wrestling Championship is held annually at the Bentley Brook Inn in Ashbourne, Derbyshire, England. Top players include Tom "100m" Martin, Paul "Toeminator" Beech and Alan "Nasty" Nash,[1] who is the current world champion.

Rules[edit]

Toe wrestling is similar to arm wrestling. To play, players must take off their shoes and socks as the game is played with bare feet. It is common courtesy for each player to remove the other player's shoes and socks. Players must link toes and each player's foot must touch flat on the other person's foot. The opponents proceed to attempt to pin (capture or trap) the other's foot for three seconds while avoiding the same. There are 3 rounds played on a best 2 out of 3 basis. First with the right foot, then left, and right again if necessary.

Prominent competitors[edit]

Alan 'Nasty' Nash - appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno following his win in 1997.[2] Features on the front cover of Eccentric Britain (2nd Edition) by Benedict le Vay.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]