Toho Bank

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The Toho Bank, Ltd
東邦銀行
Public (TYO: 8345)
Industry Banking
Financial Services
Founded Koriyama, Fukushima, Japan
Headquarters Fukushima, Japan (December 1946)
Number of locations
114
Key people
Kiyoshi Kitamura (President)
Products Retail Banking
Payday advance
Mortgages
Consumer Finance
Investment Banking
6.36 billion yen
Total assets 4.66 trillion yen
Number of employees
1,860
Website Toho Bank homepage
Toho Bank branch office in Fukushima

The The Toho Bank, Ltd. (株式会社東邦銀行 Kabushiki-gaisha Tōhō Ginkō?) is a Japanese regional bank headquartered in Fukushima, Fukushima Prefecture, in the Tōhoku region of northern Honshū. The Toho Bank provides financial services for individual and corporate customers, including deposits, loans, real estate, securities trading and investment, foreign exchange, and bond underwriting and registration services as well as ATM and credit card services.

History[edit]

The Toho Bank was established on November 4, 1941 by the merger of the Koriyama Commercial Bank with the Aizu Bank and Shirakawa Bank, with its head office in the city of Koriyama, Fukushima. In August 1942, the Miharu Bank, Inawashiro Bank and Iwase Industrial Bank were merged into the Toho Bank as part the Japanese government’s wartime consolidation of Japanese industries. In February 1943, the bank was further enlarged by merger with the Yabuki Bank, Tamura Entrepreneurial Bank and the Iwato Bank, and with the Fukushima Savings Bank in November 1944. The head office was relocated to the city of Fukushima in December 1946. The Toho Bank was listed on the second section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange from April 1973, and in the first section since February 1974.

Like several other Japanese regional banks around the end of the Japanese bubble economy, the Toho Bank opened up branches in New York and Hong Kong in 1990 and 1992, respectively. Both of these branches were closed in the late 1990s. While the bank has recently made advances in reducing its burden of non-performing loans and increasing its capital-adequacy ratio, it has recently been cited by the Japanese Financial Services Agency for excessive incidences of misplacing customer information.[1]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Nikkei article over Toho’s loss of customer information] (Japanese)