Tomás Regalado (Salvadoran politician)

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This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Regalado and the second or maternal family name is Romero.
Tomás Regalado
Tomás Regalado.jpg
President of El Salvador
In office
14 November 1898 – 1 March 1903
Preceded by Rafael Antonio Gutiérrez
Succeeded by Pedro José Escalón
Personal details
Born (1860-11-07)7 November 1860
Santa Ana
El Salvador
Died 7 July 1906(1906-07-07) (aged 45)
Yupiltepeque
Guatemala
Nationality Salvadoran
Political party No Party

General Tomás Regalado Romero (born Santa Ana, El Salvador, November 7, 1861 – died Guatemala, July 7, 1906) was President of El Salvador from 14 November 1898 until 1 March 1903. He was a military ruler and gained power by deposing Rafael Antonio Gutiérrez, a man he had previously helped achieve control of the country by taking part in a conspiracy to oust Carlos Ezeta four years earlier. Elected to a four-year term in 1899, he promoted the construction of railways, declared an amnesty for political exiles, and began the construction of a National Theatre in Santa Ana.

Upon leaving office, he remained active in the Army of El Salvador and was appointed Minister of War by his handpicked successor Pedro José Escalón. During a war against Guatemala in 1906 he led a Salvadoran invasion force and went into battle whilst drunk. Seriously injured, he soon died on the 11th of June . His coup d'état led to the dissolution of the Greater Republic of Central America after his government withdrew from it.[1]

Regalado was the last in a series of presidents who had come to power by force during the 19th Century. His peaceful transfer of power to Pedro José Escalón in 1903 allowed for a degree of political stability that persisted until the events of 1931-32.

Political offices
Preceded by
Rafael Antonio Gutiérrez
President of El Salvador
1898–1903
Succeeded by
Pedro José Escalón

References[edit]

  1. ^ Walker, Thomas W. Nicaragua, the Land of Sandino. Boulder: Westview Press, 1981., p. 17.