Tom Daxon

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Tom Daxon
Chairman of the Oklahoma Republican Party
In office
2006–2008
Preceded by Gary Jones
Succeeded by Gary Jones
Oklahoma Secretary of Finance and Revenue
In office
March 17, 1995 – January 13, 2003
Governor Frank Keating
Succeeded by Scott Meacham
Oklahoma Director of State Finance
In office
March 17, 1995 – January 13, 2003
Governor Frank Keating
Succeeded by Scott Meacham
Interim County Treasurer for Orange County, California
In office
December 22, 1994 – March 17, 1995
Preceded by Robert Citron
Succeeded by John Moorlach
9th Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector
In office
January 8, 1979 – January 10, 1983
Governor George Nigh
Preceded by John M. Rogers
Succeeded by Clifton Scott
Personal details
Born December 19,1947
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Linda Wright Daxon
Alma mater Oklahoma State University
Profession Accountant, Statesman

Thomas E. "Tom" Daxon (born December 19, 1947) is an American businessman and politician from Oklahoma. Daxon has held numerous positions with the Oklahoma state government, including being elected Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector in 1978 and serving as the Oklahoma Secretary of Finance and Revenue under Governor of Oklahoma Frank Keating. He was the Republican nominee for Governor in 1982, ultimately losing to Democratic incumbent George Nigh.

Education and early career[edit]

A native of Oklahoma City, Daxon earned his bachelor's degree in economics from Oklahoma State University (OSU) in 1970 and received his master's degree in geography from OSU in 1977. While in college, Daxon became an activist for the Oklahoma Republican Party. He served as the president of the Oklahoma State University College Republicans.

After graduating from OSU, Daxon moved to Sand Springs, Oklahoma, and joined the Tulsa-based CPA firm of Hurdman and Cranstoun as an auditor.

Oklahoma State Auditor[edit]

In 1978, Daxon was elected Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector, unseating 20-year Democratic incumbent John M. Rogers. Rogers had allowed that office to decline to the point that the federal government was threatening to cut off federal funds. At the time of his election, Daxon was only 31 years old and was the only Republican to hold a statewide office in Oklahoma.

Daxon raised the number of CPAs on his staff from only 1 to 26 while cutting the total office staff from 126 to 81. He formed an investigative unit that exposed questionable practices in certain license plate agencies and at the Oklahoma Department of Human Services. He introduced modern auditing techniques that included operational reviews of audited agencies and financial reporting in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, leading Oklahoma to become the first state to issue comprehensive GAAP-basis general purpose financial statements, using its own staff.

County Commissions scandal[edit]

In 1981, Daxon cooperated with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in its probe of many Oklahoma county commissioners. By the end of the investigation in 1984, more than 200 people (mostly county commissioners) from 60 of Oklahoma's 77 counties had been convicted of crimes. Most were convicted of taking kickbacks paid by suppliers on orders for county road-building supplies. More than 70 sitting commissioners had to resign in connection with the probe. 69 counties had commissioners resign in the wake of the probe, and 13 counties lost all three of their commissioners in connection with the scandal.

1982 Gubernatorial campaign[edit]

Daxon left the State Auditor's Office to become the Republican nominee for Governor of Oklahoma. Daxon challenged incumbent Democrat George Nigh. Nigh was ultimately successful in seeking reelection, defeating Daxon 62% to 38%.

Work for Arthur Andersen[edit]

Following his defeat in the gubernatorial election, in 1983, Daxon moved his family to McLean, Virginia, and joined accounting giant Arthur Andersen where he served as an adviser on government audits and accounting until 1990. In 1993 Daxon became the Manager of Quality Assurance for Arthur Anderson and oversaw major elements of the Resolution Trust Corporation. His team eliminated a nationally-publicized backlog of unreconciled accounts and worked with outside auditors to obtain the RTC's first clean audit opinion. He was also responsible for special projects relating to privatization in state and local government for Arthur Andersen.

Orange County Treasurer[edit]

While employed by Arthur Anderson in 1994, Daxon was appointed as head of a delegation from the firm tasked with providing financial advice to Orange County, California following an investment fund melt-down which resulted in the loss of at least $1.5 billion through high-risk investments in derivatives, the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history filed under Chapter 9 in December, 1994, and the resignation and subsequent criminal prosecution of Orange County Treasurer Robert Citron. Upon arriving in Orange County later that month, he was appointed to a four-month term as interim County Treasurer and oversaw the County's efforts to emerge from bankruptcy in June 1995.[1]

Keating Administration[edit]

However, shortly after Republican Frank Keating was elected Governor of Oklahoma in November 1994, Keating had asked Daxon to be his budget director. In order for Daxon to be able to accept the California assignament, then Governor of California Pete Wilson called Keating and asked if California could borrow Daxon to help sort out the Orange County mess. Keating agreed to a 4 month loan of Daxon's services. Daxon returned to Oklahoma full-time in April 1995 to serve as Keating's budget director. In that position, Daxon was responsible for overseeing the developing and implementation of the Keating's annual state budget.[2]

Concurrent with his service as State Finance Director, Keating appointed Daxon as Oklahoma Secretary of Finance and Revenue. As Finance Secretary, Daxon was responsible for developing Keating's economic and tax policies as well as providing oversight to the State's finance agencies, including the Oklahoma Tax Commission, the Oklahoma State Banking Department, the Oklahoma Department of Consumer Credit, the Oklahoma Department of Securities, and the Oklahoma Department of Insurance.[3]

Daxon remained as Finance Secretary for Keating's entire eight years as Governor.

Other governmental service[edit]

Corporation Commission[edit]

When Democrat Brad Henry was elected Governor, Daxon was appointed interim General Administrator for the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Daxon served in that position from January to June, 2003.[4]

Opportunity Oklahoma[edit]

Daxon resigned from the Corporation Commission to become the Executive Director of Opportunity Oklahoma, an Oklahoma City business organization designed to help state officials create an environment conducive for economic growth. He remained in that position until 2005.[5]

OK House of Representatives[edit]

In the 2004 Oklahoma general election, Republicans gained a majority in the Oklahoma House of Representatives for the first time since 1921. Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives-elect Todd Hiett (R-Kellyville) appointed Daxon Director of the House Office of Budget and Performance Review. As Director, he provided fiscal analysis to the House speaker and Appropriation and Budget committee chairmen and oversaw all performance reviews of state agency operations.[6]

Oklahoma Republican Party[edit]

Daxon was elected Chairman of the Oklahoma Republican Party in 2006 and served for one year, during which time the Republican Party picked up additional legislative seates in the 2006 fall elections. Daxon was succeeded as Chairman by Gary Jones in April 2007.

Personal life[edit]

Tom has been married to the former Linda Wright of Emporia, KS, since 1972 and they have two sons: Ben and Johnny. Ben is a Captain in the Army and an anesthesologist at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Johnny is a 2009 graduate of Oklahoma University and works in Oklahoma City.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Platte, Mark (1995-03-10). "Orange County In Bankruptcy County Concludes Selling Airport, Landfills Not Worth It". LA Times. 
  2. ^ Jenkins, Ron (1997-01-16). "State revenues surge 12.3% in December". The Journal Record. Retrieved 2014-07-02.  – via Questia (subscription required)
  3. ^ Rodgers, Kim (1995-01-20). "Hiring Freeze Stays for State Employees". The Journal Record. Retrieved 2014-07-02.  – via Questia (subscription required)
  4. ^ Carter, Ray (2003-01-31). "Daxon to guide Corporation Commission". The Journal Record. Retrieved 2014-07-02. 
  5. ^ Wilmoth, Adam (2003-06-01). "Head of Oklahoma Regulatory Commission to Take Oklahoma City Economic Post". Tribune Business News. Retrieved 2014-07-02.  – via Highbeam (subscription required)
  6. ^ Carter, Ray (2004-11-30). "Tom Daxon to direct OK House Office of Budget and Performance Review". The Journal Record. Retrieved 2014-07-02.  – via Questia (subscription required)

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
John M. Rogers
Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector
January 8, 1979 - January 10, 1983
Succeeded by
Clifton Scott
Preceded by
Robert Citron
Interim County Treasurer for Orange County, California
December 22, 1994 - March 17, 1995
Succeeded by
John Moorlach
Preceded by
Oklahoma Secretary of Finance and Revenue
Under Governor Frank Keating

March 17, 1995 - January 13, 2003
Succeeded by
Scott Meacham
Preceded by
Oklahoma Director of State Finance
Under Governor Frank Keating

March 17, 1995 - January 13, 2003
Party political offices
Preceded by
Ron Shotts
Republican nominee for Governor of Oklahoma
1982
Succeeded by
Henry Bellmon
Preceded by
Gary Jones
Chairman of the Oklahoma Republican Party
2006-2008
Succeeded by
Gary Jones