Tom Edlefsen

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Tom Edlefsen
Country United States United States
Born (1941-12-12) December 12, 1941 (age 72)
Piedmont, California
Height 6'2" (188 cm)
Plays Right-handed
Singles
Career record 51-93
Career titles 1
Highest ranking No. 94 (June 3, 1974)
Grand Slam Singles results
French Open 1R (1968, 1969, 1973)
Wimbledon 4R (1968)
US Open 3R (1962, 1965)
Doubles
Career record 69-75
Career titles 1

Tom Edlefsen (born December 12, 1941) is a former professional tennis player from the United States.

Career[edit]

Edlefsen was a member of three NCAA Championship winning teams while at the University of Southern California, in 1963, 1964 and 1966. He was a three time All-American.[1]

He won the U.S. National Hardcourt doubles titles in 1963 and 1965.[1]

At the U.S. National Indoors in 1964, Edlefsen had wins over both Arthur Ashe and Roy Emerson.[2]

In 1967, he developed a nerve disease, Guillain–Barré syndrome, after suffering a reaction to a smallpox vaccination he had while with the Air Force Reserves. He was left with total paralysis.[3]

He recovered after six months in hospital and returned to tennis, notably making the fourth round at the 1968 Wimbledon Championships, along the way defeating 14th seed Cliff Drysdale. Raymond Moore defeated him in the fourth round over five sets.[4]

In 1972, Edlefsen won a singles title at the Kansas City Open and a doubles title at the Washington Indoor tournament.[1]

Grand Prix/WCT career finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (1–0)[edit]

Outcome No. Year Tournament Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1. 1972 United States Kansas City, United States United States Erik Van Dillen 6-3, 6-3

Doubles: 3 (1–2)[edit]

Outcome No. Year Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Winner 1. 1972 United States Washington D.C., United States Carpet United States Cliff Richey United States Clark Graebner
Brazil Thomaz Koch
Runner-up 2. 1974 Spain Barcelona, Spain Carpet United States Tom Leonard United States Arthur Ashe
United States Roscoe Tanner
3-6, 4-6
Runner-up 3. 1974 United States Tucson, United States Hard Spain Manuel Orantes United States Charlie Pasarell
United States Sherwood Stewart
4-6, 4-6

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c ATP World Tour Profile
  2. ^ Montreal Gazette, "Unseeded Tom Edlefsen Upsets Roy Emerson", February 21, 1964, p. 24
  3. ^ Los Angeles Times, "Tom Edlefsen Beats Virus", June 30, 1968
  4. ^ ITF Pro Circuit Profile