Tom Hoover

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Tom Hoover
No. 23, 12, 24, 41, 10
Center
Personal information
Born (1941-01-23) January 23, 1941 (age 73)
Washington, D.C.
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Listed weight 230 lb (104 kg)
Career information
High school Archbishop Carroll (Washington, D.C.)
College Villanova
NBA draft 1963 / Round: 1 / Pick: 6th overall
Selected by the Syracuse Nationals
Pro career 1962–1970
Career history
1962–1963 Camden Bullets (EPBL)
19631965 New York Knicks
1965–1966 Wilmington Blue Bombers (EPBL)
1966–1967 Wilmington Blue Bombers (EPBL)
1967 St. Louis Hawks
1967–1968 Denver Rockets (ABA)
1968 Houston Mavericks (ABA)
1968–1969 Minnesota Pipers (ABA)
1969 New York Nets (ABA)
1969–1970 Wilmington Blue Bombers (EPBL)
Career NBA and ABA statistics
Points 1,311 (5.9 ppg)
Rebounds 1,388 (6.2 rpg)
Assists 237 (1.1 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Thomas Lee Hoover, Jr. (born January 23, 1941 in Washington, DC) is an American former professional basketball player.

A 6'9" forward/center from Villanova University, Hoover played in the National Basketball Association from 1963 to 1967 as a member of the New York Knicks and St. Louis Hawks. He jumped to the American Basketball Association in 1967, and played two seasons there with the Denver Rockets, Houston Mavericks, Minnesota Pipers, and New York Nets. In his NBA/ABA career, Hoover averaged 5.9 points and 6.2 rebounds per game.[1]

Since his basketball career ended, Hoover has worked in a wide variety of fields. With former NFL player Lane Howell, he ran an employment program for teenagers in New York City. Afterward, he turned to the entertainment industry, and worked as a road manager for Richard Pryor, The Spinners and Natalie Cole. He had a brief career acting in television commercials, then channeled his interest in boxing into a job with the New York State Athletic Commission. He later ran the Adopt-A-School Program in New York City.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tom Hoover. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on September 24, 2009.
  2. ^ "Where Are They Now?" Tom Hoover. nba.com. 2009. Retrieved on September 24, 2009.