Tom Kidd (golfer)

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Tom Kidd
— Golfer —
Personal information
Full name Christopher Thomas Kidd
Born c. 1848
St. Andrews, Scotland
Died 16 January 1884 (aged 35 or 36)
St. Andrews, Scotland
Nationality  Scotland
Career
Status Professional
Best results in major championships
(Wins: 1)
The Open Championship Won: 1873

Christopher Thomas Kidd (died 16 January 1884 aged 35[1] or 36[2][3]) was a Scottish golfer. He was a caddie[4] from St Andrews and won the 1873 Open Championship over his home links.[5] It was the first Open played on the Old Course. Conditions were wet and Kidd's winning score of 179 was the highest in any Open Championship played over 36 holes. His cash prize was £11.

He was known as Tom Kidd or "Young Tom Kidd"[3] to distinguish him from his father Tom Kidd who was also a caddie and died in the poorhouse in Markinch in 1896.[6] Kidd married Eliza (or Elizabeth) Lumsden in November 1874 aged 25, when he is described as a golf caddie.[7] He died suddenly of a heart problem in 1884[2] and left two surviving children.[3] His wife did not remarry and died in Cupar in 1935.[8]

At a court for the renewal of drink licences in St Andrews in April 1884, the inspector of police said that the licencee of the Golf Inn, George Leslie, illegally bought clubs and similar items for drinks. After Kidd's death his cleek and iron were found in Leslie's possession together with the gold medal for winning the 1873 Open. Leslie had paid 2 shillings each for the club and 10 shillings for the gold medal. The three items were later bought by a third party and the gold medal returned to his widow. Leslie denied the allegation stating that he had bought the clubs but not the medal. The medal had been taken as surety for a 10 shilling loan. He claimed that, at the time Kidd was a "Good Templar" and "not a shilling" of the money had been spent in the inn. It was considered a "very suspicious case".[9][10] After an adjournment the licence was granted by a majority of 3 to 2.[11]

Major championships[edit]

Wins (1)[edit]

Year Championship 18 holes Winning score Margin Runner-up
1873 The Open Championship Tied for lead 91-88=179 1 stroke Scotland Jamie Anderson

Results timeline[edit]

Tournament 1873 1874 1875 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881 1882
The Open Championship 1 T8 DNP T17 DNP DNP 5 DNP DNP T11

DNP = Did not play
"T" indicates a tie for a place
Green background for wins. Yellow background for top-10

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Death of a Noted Golfer". Dundee Courier. 17 January 1884. Retrieved 21 February 2015 – via British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required (help)). 
  2. ^ a b "Deaths in the United District of St Andrews and St Leonards in the County of Fife". Statutory Deaths 453/00 0008. ScotlandsPeople. Retrieved 20 February 2015. (subscription required (help)). 
  3. ^ a b c "Sudden death of a well-known golfer". Fife Herald. 23 January 1884. Retrieved 21 December 2014 – via British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required (help)). 
  4. ^ McCartney, Keith. "Golf in St Andrews: A local view of the Home of Golf". Retrieved 16 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "1873 Tom Kidd". The Open. Retrieved 16 October 2013. 
  6. ^ "Deaths in the District of Markinch in the County of Fife". Statutory Deaths 447/00 0027. ScotlandsPeople. Retrieved 21 February 2015. (subscription required (help)). 
  7. ^ "Marriages in the United District of St Andrews and St Leonards in the County of Fife". Statutory Marriages 453/00 0038. ScotlandsPeople. Retrieved 21 February 2015. (subscription required (help)). 
  8. ^ "Deaths in the District of Cupar in the County of Fife". Statutory Deaths 420/00 0140. ScotlandsPeople. Retrieved 21 February 2015. (subscription required (help)). 
  9. ^ "Tom Kidd". Antiquegolfscotland.com. Retrieved 21 February 2015. 
  10. ^ "St Andrews Licencing Court - The Golf Inn". Fife Herald. 9 April 1884. Retrieved 21 February 2015 – via British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required (help)). 
  11. ^ "St Andrews - Adjourned Licencing Court". Dundee Courier. 10 April 1884. Retrieved 21 February 2015 – via British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required (help)).