Tom Kurvers

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Tom Kurvers
Born (1962-09-14) September 14, 1962 (age 51)
Minneapolis, MN, USA
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Defense
Shot Left
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Buffalo Sabres
New Jersey Devils
Toronto Maple Leafs
Vancouver Canucks
New York Islanders
Mighty Ducks of Anaheim
NHL Draft 145th overall, 1981
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1984–1996

Thomas James Kurvers (born September 14, 1962) is an American retired professional ice hockey defenseman who spent 11 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) between 1984 and 1995. He was a member of the 1986 Stanley Cup Champion Montreal Canadiens. He is also a former interim General Manager for the Tampa Bay Lightning during the 2009-10 season.

Playing career[edit]

Kurvers played collegiately at the University of Minnesota Duluth, and was selected 145th overall by the Montreal Canadiens in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft following his freshman season. His time with the Bulldogs culminated with winning the Hobey Baker Award, given to the most outstanding collegiate hockey player in the NCAA, as a senior in 1983–84 after registering 76 points in just 43 games.

Kurvers made his NHL debut in the 1984–85 season with the Canadiens. He won the Stanley Cup in 1986 with Montreal. After two full seasons with Montreal, and one game in the 1986–87 season, he was traded to the Buffalo Sabres for a draft pick.

Before the 1987–88 season, the Sabres traded Kurvers to the New Jersey Devils. He would play some of his best hockey for the Devils, posting 15 points in their surprising run to the 1988 Wales Conference Finals, and notching career highs of 16 goals and 66 points in 1988–89 season. He played two full seasons, and one game in the 1989–90 season, with the Devils before being traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs for the pick that would turn out to be Scott Niedermayer.

He was always a highly productive player, especially dangerous on the powerplay due to his wicked point shot and playmaking skills. That said, at even strength Tom was often a defensive liability. Several coaches along the way attempted to fix his defensive shortcomings, however, without result. Thus, Kurvers was destined to become a journeyman, making stops with the Vancouver Canucks, New York Islanders, and Mighty Ducks of Anaheim before leaving the league after the 1994–95 season. He played a season in Japan before retiring.

In his NHL career, Kurvers appeared in 659 games. He scored 93 goals and added 328 assists for 421 points. He also appeared in 57 Stanley Cup playoff games, scoring eight goals and recording 22 assists.

Post-hockey career[edit]

Following his retirement, Kurvers landed a job doing radio commentary for the Phoenix Coyotes, in part due to his connection to former Montreal teammate Bobby Smith who was GM in Phoenix at the time. Following one season in that capacity, he was hired as a pro scout by the Coyotes. Kurvers was promoted again, to Director of Player Personnel, in 2005.

Kurvers is married and has 4 children.

Awards and honours[edit]

Award Year
All-WCHA First Team 1983–84
AHCA West First-Team All-American 1983–84

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1980–81 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 39 6 24 30 48
1981–82 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 37 11 31 42 18
1982–83 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 45 8 36 44 42
1983–84 U. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 43 18 58 76 46
1984–85 Montreal Canadiens NHL 75 10 35 45 30 12 0 6 6 6
1985–86 Montreal Canadiens NHL 62 7 23 30 36
1986–87 Montreal Canadiens NHL 1 0 0 0 2
1986–87 Buffalo Sabres NHL 55 6 17 23 22
1987–88 New Jersey Devils NHL 56 5 29 34 46 19 6 9 15 38
1988–89 New Jersey Devils NHL 74 16 50 66 38
1989–90 New Jersey Devils NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1989–90 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 70 15 37 52 29 5 0 3 3 4
1990–91 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 19 0 3 3 8
1990–91 Vancouver Canucks NHL 32 4 23 27 20 6 2 2 4 12
1991–92 New York Islanders NHL 74 9 47 56 30
1992–93 Capital District Islanders AHL 7 3 4 7 8
1992–93 New York Islanders NHL 52 8 30 38 38 12 0 2 2 6
1993–94 New York Islanders NHL 66 9 31 40 47 3 0 0 0 2
1994–95 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 22 4 3 7 6
1995–96 Seibu Japan 40 18 34 52 85 2 1 2 3 36
NHL totals 659 93 328 421 352 57 8 22 30 68

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Bob Mason
WCHA Player of the Year
1983–84
Succeeded by
Bill Watson
Preceded by
Mark Fusco
Winner of the Hobey Baker Award
1983–84
Succeeded by
Bill Watson