Tom London

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For the British magician, see Tom London (magician).
Tom London
Born Leonard Clapham
(1889-08-24)August 24, 1889
Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.
Died December 5, 1963(1963-12-05) (aged 74)
Hollywood, California, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1915–1962

Tom London (August 24, 1889 – December 5, 1963) was an American actor who, according to "The Guinness Book of Movie Records," is credited with appearing in the most movies in the history of Hollywood, this according to a 2001 book Film Facts, where it states that he was the performer who played in the most movies was "Tom London, who made his first of over 2000 appearances in the 'Great Train Robbery'". (Film Facts, Patrick Robertson, Pg. 97). Born Leonard Clapham in Louisville, Kentucky, he got his start in movies as a props man in Chicago, Illinois.

His debut was in 1915 in the Western Lone Larry, performing under his own name. In 1925, after having appeared in many silent films, he changed his name to Tom London, and used that name for the rest of his career. The first film in which he was billed under his new name was Winds of Chance, a World War I film, in which he played "Sgt. Rock".

London was a trick rider and roper, and used his trick skills in scores of Westerns. He appeared as the sidekick to Western star Sunset Carson in several films.

London is credited in several prints of The Great Train Robbery, but since he was only 14 years old when that movie was filmed in 1903, it's unlikely that he actually appeared in it. One of the busiest character actors, he appeared in over 600 films.

London made many guest appearances in television shows through the 1950s, such as The Range Rider, with Jock Mahoney and Dick Jones. His last movie was Underworld U.S.A. in 1961.

He died in North Hollywood and was interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.

Selected filmography[edit]

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