Tom Stern (director)

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Tom Stern
Born United States
Occupation Director, actor, writer, producer

Tom Stern is an American actor, director, writer, and producer living in Los Angeles, California.[citation needed]

Education[edit]

Stern grew up in Pleasantville, New York and attended Byram Hills High School in Armonk, New York, and then went to film school at Tisch School of the Arts New York University (NYU) from 1983–87,[citation needed] where he met Alex Winter.[1] The two collaborated on a number of short films including Squeal of Death,[1] which was noticed by an executive at Columbia Pictures in 1986.

Hollywood[edit]

In 1987 Stern and Winter drove to Hollywood and sent a copy of Squeal of Death to Sam Raimi, whose film Evil Dead 2 was an inspiration to them. Raimi responded enthusiastically. He and his partner Rob Tapert optioned an anthology comedy feature film script from Stern and Winter.[citation needed] The pair then worked on a number of short films and music videos for bands such as Red Hot Chili Peppers, Ice Cube, and Butthole Surfers.[citation needed] They also directed Impact Video Magazine for producer Stuart Shapiro. Impact was a counter-culture arts magazine that featured short films, performances, and interviews with the likes of Butthole Surfers, painter Robert Williams, hip hop pioneers Public Enemy, robotic art collective Survival Research Labs, and comedian Bill Hicks.[citation needed]

Stern and Winter teamed up with writer Tim Burns on the The Idiot Box, a sketch comedy show for MTV,[2] with Stern and Winter also co-starring and co-directing.[1][3]

Immediately following The Idiot Box, Stern, Winter and Burns co-wrote the 1993 film Freaked with Stern and Winter also serving as co-directors. Freaked starred Winter, Randy Quaid, Keanu Reeves, Bobcat Goldthwait and Mr T.[2] The film gained a cult following and in 2013 played at Cinefamily in Los Angeles in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its release.[4]

Stern also co-wrote the screenplay to An American Werewolf in Paris, the sequel to the 1981 film An American Werewolf in London, with Burns and Anthony Waller.[5][6]

Stern and Burns also collaborated on The Chimp Channel[7] and Monkey-ed Movies.[citation needed]

Stern has worked with Jimmy Kimmel's production company Jackhole Productions on shows such as Jimmy Kimmel Live!,[citation needed] The Man Show as segment director,[8] and Crank Yankers as director and supervising producer.[9] In addition, Stern appeared as an actor and worked as a writer for Trey Parker and Matt Stone's presidential parody, That's My Bush!,[10] as co-executive producer, served as director and writer for The Andy Milonakis Show,[11] and was one of the creators and producers of the Comedy Central travel show parody Gerhard Reinke's Wanderlust.[12]

In May 2008, Stern directed a music video for Russian metal band ANJ(ru) called "Gorbachev: Bigger and Russianer". He posted it on his Vimeo page in July and within four weeks it had been viewed over four hundred and eighty thousand times and 111K on YouTube all by word of mouth.[citation needed] In July 2008, Stern directed the Kanye West hosted puppet show pilot Alligator Boots.[citation needed] In August 2008 Stern completed the rear projection content for Cheech & Chong's Light Up America tour.[citation needed]

Filmography[edit]

  • "Hollywood Hillbillies (Reelz channel series)" (2014) - Executive Producer
  • "Urban Tarzan (Spike TV series)" (2012) - Executive Producer
  • "Joe Schmo: The Full Bounty (Spike TV series)" (2012) - Director
  • "Stevie TV (VH1 sketch comedy series)" (2012, 2013) - Director, co-executive producer
  • "Marc Saves America (MTV Pilot)" (2011) - Director, Executive Producer
  • "1000 Ways to Die (Spike TV series)" (2010) - Supervising Producer
  • "Alligator Boots (Comedy Central Pilot)" (2008) - Director
  • "Harden High (MTV Pilot)" 2007 - Writer Director Executive Producer, Co-Creator with Jason Jordan
  • "Saul of the Molemen" (2007) - Writer, Director, Executive Producer
  • "The Andy Milonakis Show" (2005) - Writer, Director, Executive Producer
  • "Gerhard Reinke's Wanderlust" (2003) - Writer, Director, Executive Producer
  • "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" (2003) - Director
  • "That's My Bush!" (2001) - Writer
  • "The Chimp Channel" (1999) - Writer, Producer
  • "The Man Show" (1999) - Director
  • An American Werewolf in Paris (1997) - Co-writer
  • Freaked (1993) - Co-Writer, Co-director, Actor
  • "The Idiot Box" (1991) - Writer, Actor, Co-director

Music videos[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Farber, Jim (April 20, 1991). "Alex Winter's 'Idiot Box' Series Unleashes Violence For Laughs". New York Daily News. Retrieved November 27, 2014 – via Chicago Tribune. 
  2. ^ a b Willman, Chris (October 4, 1993). "Movie Review: 'Freaked': Potty-Level Humor Mixed With Terrific Effects". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Publishing). Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  3. ^ Willman, Chris (March 23, 1991). "TV Review: Hey, What's Wrong With a Little Idiotic Stealing Among Friends?". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Publishing). Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  4. ^ Berg, Bret (September 27, 2013). "Heavy Midnites: Freaked (20th Anniv. screening, directors Alex Winter & Tom Stern in person!)". Cinefamily. Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  5. ^ Ebert, Robert (December 25, 1997). "An American Werewolf in Paris". Rogerebert.com. Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  6. ^ "An American Werewolf in Paris". The Daily Script. Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  7. ^ Richmond, Ray (June 9, 1999). "Review: 'The Chimp Channel'". Variety (Penske Business Media). Retrieved November 27, 2014. 
  8. ^ "The Man Show: Credits". Hollywood.com. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Crank Yankers: Credits". Hollywood.com. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  10. ^ "That's My Bush!: Credits". Hollywood.com. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  11. ^ "The Andy Milonakis Show: Credits". Hollywood.com. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Gerhard Reinke's Wanderlust: Full Production Credits". The New York Times. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]