Tom Tsuchiya

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Tom Tsuchiya
Born (1972-08-03)August 3, 1972
Nationality American
Field sculpture
Training Apprentice to Richard J. Miller
Website www.tomtsuchiya.com [5]

Tom Tsuchiya also known as Norikazu (born August 3, 1972) is an American artist who creates public sculpture. He is best known for bronze sculptures for Major League Baseball and the National Football League.[1][2][3]

Works[edit]

Reds Legends of Crosley Field[edit]

Tsuchiya created four life-size bronze sculptures of Cincinnati Reds players at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati, Ohio U.S.. These sculptures, depicting Crosley Field era players involved in an imaginary ballgame, represent Joe Nuxhall pitching to Frank Robinson, Ernie Lombardi catching and Ted Kluszewski on deck.[4] All four sculptures were completed by 2004.[5][6]

Madden Most Valuable Protectors Award[edit]

In 2009, Tsuchiya was commissioned to design and sculpt the Madden Most Valuable Protectors Award to honor the NFL's best offensive line.[7][8] He created this bronze trophy as a departure from the traditional award design, integrating figures of the players into the trophy's base.[9] On February 3, 2010, the offensive line of New Orleans Saints became the inaugural winner of the trophy.

Lux Mundi[edit]

In September 2012, Tsuchiya completed Lux Mundi, a 15.8 meter (52 feet) tall statue of Jesus for Solid Rock Church in Monroe, Ohio. This work replaces the statue of Jesus that was destroyed by a lightning strike in June, 2010. [5][10][11][12]

Atlas Recycled[edit]

In March 2010, Tsuchiya created Atlas Recycled, a sustainable art sculpture that doubles as a recycling container for aluminum cans and plastic bottles.[13][14] The 2.1 meter (7 feet) tall sculpture depicts the mythical Greek Titan Atlas bearing the earth on his shoulders. In addition to being a recycling aid, Atlas itself is made mainly from reused materials. Pieces of 14 used atlases and road maps cover the entire surface of the sculpture.[14] Most of the polymer and steel that form the structure were reused from the creation of some of the artist's previous sculptures. To celebrate Earth Day, Atlas has been exhibited in Cincinnati's Fountain Square, New York City's Grand Central Terminal and Washington D.C.'s National Mall.[13][15]

Other Works[edit]

Other notable works by Tsuchiya include the sculpture to honor slain baseball coach Cleveland Parker III. This sculpture features a relief portrait of Parker, a poem and a spiraling arrangement of representations of home plate, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd bases. At night, this sculpture announces its presence by emitting pulsating light created by digitally controlled LEDs located inside the sculpture's body. Tsuchiya collaborated with American poet Nikki Giovanni on this memorial who wrote a poem celebrating Cleveland Parker's life that is inscribed on the north side of the sculpture. Cleveland Parker was a Cincinnati youth baseball coach who was fatally struck by a stray bullet on July 12, 2005.[16]

In September 17, 2011, the Cincinnati Reds unveiled Tsuchiya's statue of the great Reds catcher, Johnny Bench. Tsuchiya's fifth statue for Great American Ball Park is located near the entrance of the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum. The statue represents Bench in the act of throwing out a base runner.[17] Johnny Bench stated that the unveiling of his statue was "his greatest moment." [18]

In June 27, 2012, the Cincinnati Reds announced that Tsuchiya will make the statue of Joe Morgan for dedication in summer 2013. [19]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pahigian, Josh, & O’Connell, Kevin. “The Ultimate Baseball Road Trip, 2nd: A Fan's Guide to Major League Stadiums”. P. 201. Lyons Press, 2012. ISBN 978-0-7627-7340-4>
  2. ^ Fine, Larry. "New 'Madden Award' to Honor Best Offensive Line." ABC News/ESPN Sports. November 12, 2009. [1]
  3. ^ Erardi, John. "Local Sculptor Crafts Tribute to Blockers." The Cincinnati Enquirer. December 16, 2009. [2]
  4. ^ Stupp, Dan. Opening Day at Great American Ball Park, p. 58. Sports Publishing L.L.C., 2003. ISBN 1-58261-724-4 >
  5. ^ a b "In Baseball’s Bronze Age, Statues are Becoming Bigger Part of the Landscape". The New York Times. 2011-09-21. Retrieved 2012-07-19. 
  6. ^ "Photo Gallery". The Cincinnati Enquirer. 2004-06-28. Retrieved 2012-07-20. 
  7. ^ Sandomir, Richard. "For Madden, at 73, The Game's Still On." The New York Times. December 16, 2009.[3]
  8. ^ NFL.com. "Madden Most Valuable Protectors Award"
  9. ^ Erardi, John. "Local Sculptor Crafts Tribute to Blockers." The Cincinnati Enquirer. December 16, 2009. [4]
  10. ^ "Construction progressing on new Jesus statue along I-75". WCPO. June 15, 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-07. 
  11. ^ "Jesus: He’s Back! And he wants a Hug!". CNN.com. 2012-09-19. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  12. ^ "Ohio town ready to welcome Jesus with open arms". USA Today. August 16, 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  13. ^ a b "Celebrating Earth Day Around the World". The Washington Post. 2012-04-20. Retrieved 2012-08-24. 
  14. ^ a b "Rain Does Not Dampen Spirits on Earth Day". The Georgetowner. 2012-04-23. Retrieved 2012-08-24. 
  15. ^ "Eco-Sculptures Go Up on Square". Cincinnati.com. 2011-08-04. Retrieved 2012-08-24. 
  16. ^ Mauch, Lisa. "Eastern Hills Journal." July 12, 2006.
  17. ^ "Johnny Bench: Bronze Age". The Cincinnati Enquirer. 2011-09-17. Retrieved 2012-08-24. 
  18. ^ "Bench calls statue his ‘greatest moment’". MLB.com. 2011-09-17. Retrieved 2012-08-24. 
  19. ^ "Joe Morgan Statue Planned for Great American Ball Park". Local 12.com. 2012-06-27. Retrieved 2012-08-24. 

External links[edit]

  • Tom Tsuchiya Official Website [6]
  • Atlas Recycled [7]
  • City of Sculpture [8]
  • "Johnny Bench: Bronze Age" [9]
  • NFL.com: "Building the O-Line Trophy" [10]