Tomo Vladimirski

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Tomo Vladimirski (Macedonian: Томо Владамирски) (1904-1971) was a Macedonian painter, considered to be one of the founders of Macedonian painting.[1]

Career[edit]

Artist during the War period were limited in their creativity due to necessary condition for artistic creation; therefore, the number of paintings they contributed were relatively small in quantity. Vladimirski, along with Vasilie Popovich – Cico, Dimo Todorovski, Nikola Martinoski, Borko Lazesk, are who were affected by conditions of the time.[2] In addition to being a painter, he worked with Nikola MartinoskiIn and Vasilije Cico Popovic to create a number of stage designs.[3] These stage designs were reported to give the a sense of realism to the acting in the plays, operas, and ballets during the time period, post World War II.[4]

Painting Style[edit]

He was a landscape painter who painted the natural beauty of Macedonia.[1] He used elements of realism in the beginning and later the phase of impressionism and retaining the lyrical expressionism.[5] His paintings of landscapes were the most notable. Senior custodian in the National Gallery, Mirjana Talevska describes Vladimirski's work, “by describing an area, he turns his painting into a personal diary of his urges and moods”.[1] Vladimirski also created still lifes and motifs from urban panoramas with a frequent focus on the landscapes around the rivers Radika and Vardar.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c http://www.culture.in.mk/story.asp?id=11389 Macedonian Culture - Tomo Vladimirski
  2. ^ "The educational, cultural and religious life (1941–1944)". Board Mill. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Exhibition on 100th Years of Birth of Nikola Martinoski". Culture: Republic of Macedonia. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  4. ^ Rubin, Don. "Europe". The World Encyclopedia of Contempory Theater. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "Cultural Heritage". City Library "Brothers Miladinovci" Skopje. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "TOMO VLADIMIRSKI". DLUM Association of Arts of Macedonian. Retrieved 4 July 2013.