Toni Graphia

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Toni Graphia
Born 1961/1962 (age 52–53)[1]
Years active 1989–present[1]
Television China Beach, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, Battlestar Galactica
Awards Peabody Award

Toni Graphia is a television writer and producer.

Career[edit]

Graphia got her start as part of an Writers Guild of America apprenticeship program under which she "went from opening fan mail to selling scripts in just a few years."[1]

Her work as screenwriter and producer was cited when the 2005 season of Battlestar Galactica received a Peabody Award for "plotlines that are deeply personal and relatable, while never compromising their affinity and passion for science fiction."[2]

Toni Graphia left the Battlestar Galactica writer's room after Season 2, due to unknown circumstances. By the next television season, she was working as a co-executive producer on Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles.

Selected credits[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Graphia, the daughter of a prominent Louisiana judge,[3] has been openly lesbian since February 2006,[4] having come out in a "public way" at a Writers Guild of America panel.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sharon Bernstein (February 18, 1990). "The Women of TV's Vietnam : Females on front lines of Tour of Duty and China Beach wage battle against male-dominated network TV". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2011-10-18. "The youngest woman on the two shows—28-year-old Toni Graphia of China Beach—went from opening fan mail to selling scripts in just a few years under a Writers Guild apprenticeship program." 
  2. ^ "Battlestar Galactica (Sci Fi)". Peabody Awards. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. 2005. Retrieved 2011-10-18. "Writers Ronald D. Moore, Toni Graphia, David Weddle, Bradley Thompson, Carla Robinson, Jeff Vlaming, Michael Angeli, and David Eick take full advantage to give us plotlines that are deeply personal and relatable, while never compromising their affinity and passion for science fiction. Moore, Graphia, and Eick are the executive producers." 
  3. ^ The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows 1946-Present. Ballantine Books. 2003. p. 892. ISBN 0-345-45542-8. 
  4. ^ Sarah Warn (March 3, 2006). "Best. Lesbian. Week. Ever.". AfterEllen.com. Retrieved 2008-05-09. 
  5. ^ Greg Hernandez (February 24, 2006). "Mixed results for TV shows with characters who are gay". Los Angeles Daily News. Monterey Herald. Archived from the original on 2006-05-30. Retrieved 2011-10-18. "For Graphia, participating in the WGA panel was the first time she had been out in such a public way. She received a prolonged ovation from the audience for taking that step Tuesday night and had only just begun to think about what impact it might have.'I'm not out, so when they asked me, my first response was, how did you get my name?' she said. 'My friends said, 'This is the year to be gay with Brokeback Mountain and all. If you were ever going to do it, now is the time. If you invite me back next year, I'll be able to tell you if I was discriminated against.'" 

External links[edit]