Tony Cragg

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Tony Cragg
Born (1949-04-09) April 9, 1949 (age 65)
Liverpool
Known for Sculpture
Spouse(s) Tatjana Verhasselt
Awards Turner Prize (1988)

Tony Cragg, CBE RA (born 9 April, 1949) is a British visual artist who works mainly as a sculptor. Though born in Liverpool,[1] Cragg has lived and worked in Wuppertal, Germany, since the late 1970s. [2]

Ferryman Bronze, 1997
Auf der Lichtung in Bielefeld 1997

Life[edit]

Tony Cragg was born in Liverpool in 1949,[3] and initially planned to follow a similar career path to his father, who worked as an electrical engineer in the aircraft industry and helped develop the Concorde.[4] At 17, Cragg began work as a Lab Technician at the National Rubber Producers Research Association in Welwyn Garden City.[5] However, after taking up drawing as a diversion, he soon discovered his vocation as an artist.[6]


In 1969, he began a foundation course at the Gloucestershire College of Art in Cheltenham,[7] and then moved on to a three-year undergraduate course at Wimbledon School of Art (1970-1973).[8] While at Wimbledon, Cragg was taught by artist Roger Ackling, who worked with found and discarded materials as the young Cragg later would.[9] In 1973, Cragg won a place on the prestigious post-graduate sculpture course at the Royal College of Art in London.[10]


In 1976, for a period of nine months, Cragg was a Professor at the École des Beaux Arts de Metz.[11] In 1977, he married a German trainee teacher and moved to her hometown of Wuppertal in Germany,[12] which is where he has lived and worked ever-since.[13] In 1978, Cragg began teaching at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and held a professorship there between 1988 and 2001.[14] In 1988, Cragg represented Britain at the 43. Venice Biennale and in the same year received the Turner price at the Tate Gallery in London. [15]


Career[edit]

In 1969 Cragg began a foundation course at the Gloucester College of Art and Design in Cheltenham.[16] He then moved on to a three year undergraduate course at Wimbledon School of Art in London (B.A.) where he studied between the years 1970 and 1973. [17] In 1973 Cragg won a place on the post-graduate sculpture course at the Royal College of Art (M.A.), [18] and had this first solo exhibition at the Lisson Gallery, London, in 1979.[19] His works of this period were installations constructed from found materials, such as the plastic detritus of domestic goods.[20]


In the early 1980s, Cragg moved away from installation art and began to engage more rigorously with different materials.[21] He came to be grouped together with a generation of significant British sculptors such as Richard Deacon, Bill Woodrow, Richard Wentworth, Shirazeh Houshiary, Alison Wilding, Antony Gormley and Anish Kapoor[22] - most of whom were represented by Nicholas Logsdail’s Lisson Gallery. [23] Throughout the 1980s, Cragg exhibited at internationally renowned cultural institutions such as Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol (1980); Aperto ’80, 39. Venice Biennale (1980); Musée d’Art et d’Industrie, St. Étienne (1981); Whitechapel Art Gallery, London (1981); Documenta 7, Kassel (1982); Kunsthalle Bern (1983); Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels (1985); The Brooklyn Museum (1986); Tate Gallery, London (1989); and the Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (1989). [24] By the end of the decade, Cragg had received the Turner Price at the Tate Gallery in London (1988) as well as the Von der Heydt-Kulturpreis (1989);[25] represented Britain at the 42. Venice Biennale (1988); and was appointed Professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf (1988-2001). [26]


In the early 1990s Cragg was awarded the Chevalier des Arts Lettres (1992) and was soon after appointed Royal Academician in London (1994). [27] During this decade of his career he exhibited at the 45. Venice Biennale (1993); National Gallery, Prague (1995); MNAM, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (1996); MACBA, Barcelona (1997) and the Royal Academy, London (1999). [28]


In the early 2000s, Cragg was awarded the Shakespeare Prize (2001) and the Piepenbrock Prize for Sculptures (2002). [29] He also was elected to the Akademie der Künste, Berlin (2001); appointed Commander of the British Empire (CBE) (2002); appointed Honory Doctor of the Royal College of Art, London (2009); appointed Professor at the Universitüt der Künste, Berlin (2001-2006) and began a Professorship at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf (2006).[30]


During the 2000s, Cragg exhibited at Tate Gallery Liverpool (2000); MACRO Museum of Contemporary Art, Rome (2003) and The Central House of Artists, Moscow (2005). [31] Since 2010, Cragg has been appointed Honorary Fellow of University of the Arts London (2012); awarded Artist’s Medal of Honor of the Hermitage, Russia (2012), and the 1st Class Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (2012); and has exhibited at the Musée du Louvre, Paris (2011) and the National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh (2011). [32]


Work in Public Collections[edit]


Notable Awards[edit]

1988 Turner Prize winner [34]

2002 Piepenbrock Award for Sculpture [35] Awarded the CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) [36]

2009 Honorary doctor of the Royal College of Arts [37]

2012 Cologne Fine Art Award [38]

Tony Cragg Foundation[edit]

Thirty years after Cragg began working as an artist, he began looking for a permanent site for presenting sculpture outdoors and discovered an abandoned property in Waldfrieden Park, Wuppertal, which he bought in in 2006. That same year he began redesigning the park grounds and also the buildings that, after long years of vacancy, needed to be thoroughly renovated and modernized. In appreciation of the historical estate, its former structures and material substance were preserved to the greatest extent possible, keeping its historical dimension intact despite the conversion of the park and buildings to accommodate new uses. In 2008, the Sculpture Park was opened under the auspices of the Cragg family's nonprofit foundation. It houses a steadily growing collection of sculpture, including examples from Tony Cragg's own large oeuvre. All this is accompanied by changing exhibitions of internationally known artists, lectures on culture and the humanities, and concerts. Beyond this, the Cragg Foundation is dedicated to research into, and the publication of works on, the fine arts.

[39]

Quotes[edit]

“There is this idea that sculpture is static, or maybe even dead, but I feel absolutely contrary to that. I’m not a religious person – I’m an absolute materialist – and for me material is exciting and ultimately sublime. When I’m involved in making sculpture, I’m looking for a system of belief or ethics in the material. I want that material to have a dynamic, to push and move and grow."

“I also want that to happen over the course of making things, so that as soon as one generation of sculptures has gone up, another generation is coming on and things are growing up around me. That’s how it seems to work for me.”[40]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p. 16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  2. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p. 16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  3. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  4. ^ Hall, James. ‘‘A Giddy Rush’’, p.14 ‘‘The Guardian’’, UK, 23 July 2011.
  5. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  6. ^ Morris, Roderick Conway. ‘‘Inventing a ‘new visual language’’’, p. 12 ‘‘International Herald Tribune’’, 14 October 2010.
  7. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  8. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  9. ^ Hall, James. ‘‘A Giddy Rush’’, p.14 ‘‘The Guardian’’, UK, 23 July 2011.
  10. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  11. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  12. ^ Hall, James. ‘‘A Giddy Rush’’, p.14 ‘‘The Guardian’’, UK, 23 July 2011.
  13. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  14. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  15. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  16. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  17. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  18. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  19. ^ Frings, Jutta (2003). ‘‘Tony Cragg, Signs of life Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, May 23 to October 5, 2003’’, p. 535. Düsseldorf Richter.
  20. ^ Morris, Roderick Conway. ‘‘Inventing a ‘new visual language’’’, p. 12 ‘‘International Herald Tribune’’, 14 October 2010.
  21. ^ Morris, Roderick Conway. ‘‘Inventing a ‘new visual language’’’, p. 12 ‘‘International Herald Tribune’’, 14 October 2010.
  22. ^ Hall, James. ‘‘A Giddy Rush’’, p.14 ‘‘The Guardian’’, UK, 23 July 2011.
  23. ^ Hall, James. ‘‘A Giddy Rush’’, p.14 ‘‘The Guardian’’, UK, 23 July 2011.
  24. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  25. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  26. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  27. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  28. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  29. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  30. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  31. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  32. ^ Lotz, Antonia (2012). ‘‘Tony Cragg Matrix’’, p.16. NORD/LB art gallery and kestnergesellscaft, Hannover.
  33. ^ Museo cantonale d'arte of Lugano: Tony Cragg
  34. ^ http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain-other-venues/exhibitionseries/turner-prize-series/twenty-years-turner-prize
  35. ^ http://www.chengdumoca.org/en/exhibition/column/3224
  36. ^ http://www.debretts.com/people/biographies/browse/c/11347/Anthony%20Douglas%20(Tony)+CRAGG.aspx
  37. ^ http://www.rca.ac.uk/Default.aspx?ContentID=161282&CategoryID=36283
  38. ^ http://www.absolutearts.com/artsnews/2012/09/27/artspublish/2348915556.html
  39. ^ http://skulpturenpark-waldfrieden.de/en/sculpture-park/cragg-foundation.html
  40. ^ Robert Ayers (May 10, 2007), THE AI INTERVIEW Tony Cragg, ARTINFO, retrieved 2008-04-24 

External links[edit]