Toquz Oghuz

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Toquz Oghuz (Old Turkic: Old Turkic letter Z.svgOld Turkic letter G1.svgOld Turkic letter O.svg Old Turkic letter Z.svgOld Turkic letter O.svgOld Turkic letter OQ.svgOld Turkic letter T1.svg, Toquz Oγuz[1]) is a political alliance of nine Turkic tribes. Toquz Oghuz consolidated within the Turkic Kaganate (552-743), and after its fragmentation preserved their union. Etymology of their name comes from the Turkic word "Oghuz" = "Community", which developed into "Tokuz Oghuz" = "9 Oghuz (Communities)" for Uyghurs, and similarly "Uch-Oguzes" (Turkic: uch "three"). = "3 Oghuz (Communities)" for Karluks. The base for the generalized ethnical term "Oghuz" is the word "og" = "clan, tribe", which in turn descends from the ancient Turkic word "og" = "mother". Initially the word "oguz" could designate "tribes", "tribal union", and with time became a collective ethnic name, which in some cased gained an additional determinant as "Toquz-Oghuz" = "9 (different) Oghuz"", "Uch-Oghuz" = "3 (different) Oghuz".[2] Toquz Oghuz were mentioned in the Orkhon inscriptions written in the 730es AD.

The Toquz Oghuz were mentioned in Chinese histories as the Uighurs, the Bukhu, the Khun, the Bayirku, the Tongra, Ssu-chieh, Ch'i-pi, A-pu-ssu, and Ku-lun-wu-ku. Of these, the first seven are listed as separate tribes who lived north of the Gobi, the A-pu-ssu, and Ku-lun-wu-ku only become accepted on equal footing with the others after 742. The A-pu-ssu was original a subtribe of Ssu-chieh, and the Ku-lun-wu-ku was a combination of two tribes.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kultegin's Memorial Complex, TÜRK BITIG
  2. ^ Gumilev L.N. Ancient Turks, Moscow, 'Science', 1967, Ch.5 http://gumilevica.kulichki.net/OT/ot5.htm
  3. ^ Colin Mackerras. "Chapter 12 - The Uighurs". In Denis Sinor. The Cambridge History of Early Inner Asia. p. 320. ISBN 978-0521243049.