Yom Tov Torah readings

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On Yom Tov (except on Simchat Torah), entire parshiot of the Torah are not read in the synagogue. Rather, select portions of a parsha, generally pertaining to the holiday, are read. These readings are usually shorter than a full parsha.

When a Yom Tov other than Yom Kippur falls on a day other than Shabbat, the reading is divided into five sections (not including the Maftir). On Yom Kippur, six readings take place.

On all these days, the Maftir is read from a different portion of the Torah. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.[1] This is because it is difficult and time consuming to roll the scroll to the point where the Maftir is located. The Maftir readings come from the parsha of Pinchas.

The Torah is read on Yom Tov during Shacharit services. There is no reading at Mincha on Yom Tov other than Yom Kippur, unless the day falls on Shabbat, when the regular Shabbat reading for the week is read. The Torah is also read at Mincha on all public fast days.

Shalosh Regalim[edit]

Passover[edit]

First two days[edit]

On the first day of Passover, Exodus 12:21-51 is read.[2] This reading describes the Exodus from Egypt and the Passover offering.[3]

When the first day of Passover falls out on a weekday, the individual readings are as follows:[4]
Reading 1: Exodus 12:21-24
Reading 2: Exodus 12:25-28
Reading 3: Exodus 12:29-36
Reading 4: Exodus 12:37-42
Reading 5: Exodus 12:43-51
Maftir: Numbers 28:16-25
Haftarah: Joshua 3:5-7, 5:2-6:1, 6:27

When the first day of Passover falls out on Shabbat, the individual readings are as follows:[4]
Reading 1: Exodus 12:21-24
Reading 2: Exodus 12:25-28
Reading 3: Exodus 12:29-32
Reading 4: Exodus 12:33-36
Reading 5: Exodus 12:37-42
Reading 6: Exodus 12:43-47
Reading 7: Exodus 12:48-51
Maftir: Numbers 28:16-25
Haftarah: Joshua 3:5-7, 5:2-6:1, 6:27

On the second day of Passover in the Diaspora, the reading is the same as for the first day of Sukkot, namely, Leviticus 22:26-23:44. The second day of Passover cannot occur on Shabbat. The individual readings are as follows:[5]
Reading 1: Leviticus 22:26-23:3
Reading 2: Leviticus 23:4-14
Reading 3: Leviticus 23:15-22
Reading 4: Leviticus 23:23-32
Reading 5: Leviticus 23:33-44
Maftir: Numbers 28:16-25
Haftarah: II Kings 23:1-9 and 21-25

Chol HaMoed[edit]

On the first day of Chol HaMoed, Exodus 13:1-16 is read. This section describes the commandment not to eat or possess chametz on Passover and to tell the Passover story.[6]

On the second day of Chol HaMoed, Exodus 22:24-23:19 is read. The laws of the Jewish holidays are found in this reading.[6]

On the third day of Chol HaMoed, Exodus 34:1-26 is read. This section describes Moses receiving of the second tablets of the Ten Commandments and God revealing the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy.[6]

On the fourth day of Chol HaMoed, Numbers 9:1-14 is read. This describes the laws of Pesach Sheni.[6]

When any of the days of Chol HaMoed falls out on Shabbat, Exodus 33:12-34:26 is read. (See Shabbat Chol Hamoed)

When the first day of Chol Hamoed Passover falls out on a weekday, the individual readings are always as follows:[7]
Reading 1: Exodus 13:1-4
Reading 2: Exodus 13:5-10
Reading 3: Exodus 13:11-16
Reading 4: Numbers 28:19-25

When the second day of Chol Hamoed Passover falls out on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Friday, the individual readings are as follows (if the second day of Chol Hamoed falls out on a Sunday, follow day 1 above):[8]
Reading 1: Exodus 22:24-26
Reading 2: Exodus 22:27-23:5
Reading 3: Exodus 23:6-19
Reading 4: Numbers 28:19-25

When the third day of Chol Hamoed Passover falls out on Wednesday or Thursday, the individual readings are as follows (if the third day of Chol Hamoed falls out on a Monday, follow day 2 above):[9]
Reading 1: Exodus 34:1-3
Reading 2: Exodus 34:4-17
Reading 3: Exodus 34:18-26
Reading 4: Numbers 28:19-25

The fourth day of Chol Hamoed Passover always falls out on a weekday. The individual readings are as follows:[10]
Reading 1: Numbers 9:1-5
Reading 2: Numbers 9:6-8
Reading 3: Numbers 9:9-14
Reading 4: Numbers 28:19-25

When Shabbat coincides with one of the days of Chol Hamoed, the readings are as follows:[11]
Reading 1: Exodus 33:12-16
Reading 2: Exodus 33:17-19
Reading 3: Exodus 33:20-23
Reading 4: Exodus 34:1-3
Reading 5: Exodus 34:4-10
Reading 6: Exodus 34:11-17
Reading 7: Exodus 34:18:26
Maftir: Numbers 28:19-25
Haftarah: Ezekiel 37:1-14

Last two days[edit]

On the seventh day of Passover, Exodus 13:17-15:26 is read.[12] This contains the Song of the sea.[6]

When the seventh day of Passover falls out on a weekday, the individual readings are as follows:[13]
Reading 1: Exodus 13:17-22
Reading 2: Exodus 14:1-8
Reading 3: Exodus 14:9-14
Reading 4: Exodus 14:15-25
Reading 5: Exodus 14:26-15:26
Maftir: Numbers 28:19-25
Haftarah: II Samuel 22:1-51

When the seventh day of Passover falls out on Shabbat, the individual readings are as follows:[13]
Reading 1: Exodus 13:17-13:19
Reading 2: Exodus 13:20-13:22
Reading 3: Exodus 14:1-4
Reading 4: Exodus 14:5-8
Reading 5: Exodus 14:9-14
Reading 6: Exodus 14:15-25
Reading 7: Exodus 14:26-15:26
Maftir: Numbers 28:19-25
Haftarah: II Samuel 22:1-51

The eight day of Passover (which occurs in the Diaspora only) can occur on a weekday or Shabbat. When it occurs on a weekday, Deuteronomy 15:19-16:17 is read. The individual readings are as follows:[14]
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 15:19-23
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 16:1-3
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 16:4-8
Reading 4: Deuteronomy 16:9-12
Reading 5: Deuteronomy 16:13-17
Maftir: Numbers 28:19-25
Haftarah: Isaiah 10:32-12:6

When the eighth day of Passover falls out on Shabbat, Deuteronomy 14:22-16:17 is read (this is the same reading as for Shemini Atzeret). The individual readings are as follows:[14]
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 14:22-29
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 15:1-18
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 15:19-23
Reading 4: Deuteronomy 16:1-3
Reading 5: Deuteronomy 16:4-8
Reading 6: Deuteronomy 16:9-12
Reading 7: Deuteronomy 16:13-17
Maftir: Numbers 28:19-25
Haftarah: Isaiah 10:32-12:6

Shavuot[edit]

Shavuot is a two day holiday in the Diaspora; in Israel, it lasts only one day. On the first day, which cannot occur on Shabbat, Exodus 19:1-20:23 is read.[15] The individual readings are as follows:[16]
Reading 1: Exodus 19:1-6
Reading 2:Exodus 19:7-13
Reading 3:Exodus 19:14-19
Reading 4:Exodus 19:20-20:14
Reading 5:Exodus 20:15:23
Maftir: Numbers 28:26-31
Haftarah: Ezekiel 1:1-28 and 3:12

On the second day of Shavuot (which occurs in the Diaspora only), the reading is the same as for the eighth day of Passover if it falls on a weekday, namely, Deuteronomy 15:19-16:17. When the second day of Shavuot falls on Shabbat, the reading is the same as for Shemini Atzeret, namely Deuteronomy 14:22-16:17.

When the second day of Shavuot falls out on a weekday, the individual readings are as follows:[17]
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 15:19-23
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 16:1-3
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 16:4-8
Reading 4: Deuteronomy 16:9-12
Reading 5: Deuteronomy 16:13-17
Maftir: Numbers 28:26-31
Haftarah: Habbakuk 2:20-3:19

When the second day of Shavuot falls out on Shabbat, the individual readings are as follows:[17]
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 14:22-29
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 15:1-18
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 15:19-23
Reading 4: Deuteronomy 16:1-3
Reading 5: Deuteronomy 16:4-8
Reading 6: Deuteronomy 16:9-12
Reading 7: Deuteronomy 16:13-17
Maftir: Numbers 28:26-31
Haftarah: Habbakuk 2:20-3:19

Yetziv Pitgam[edit]

During the Haftarah of the second day of Shavuot (this second day is observed only in the Diaspora, not in Eretz Yisrael) a liturgical poem called Yetziv Pitgam is inserted immediately after the first verse is read (from Habakkuk 2:20-3:19). [18] The song praises God as the Giver of the Torah and Creator of the universe.[19] The beginning of each of the letters of its 15 verses spells out the name of its author, Yaakov beribi Meir Levi;[18][20]   however, the last three lines, which provide the acrostic for "Levi" are suspected of being a later addition. The "Jacob son of Rab Meir" is commonly thought to identify Rabbeinu Tam - Rabbi Jacob Tam of 12th century France and grandson of Rashi. [21] The poem includes in its last line praise of Jonathon ben Uzziel, the translator of the Aramaic Targum of the Prophets,[22] and it is believed that this poem was written when it was still the practice to accompany the reading of the Hebrew text with an Aramaic rendition that was, from late Biblical times until well into the Middle Ages, more readily understood (it is even possible that this poem was originally positioned to introduce the Aramaic interpretation of the haftarah which is no longer part of the service). [23]

Sukkot[edit]

On Sukkot, Leviticus 22:26-23:44 is read on the first day.[24] This reading is also read on the second day of Sukkot and Passover, which are observed only in the diaspora. The reading describes journeying to the Beit Hamikdash on the Shalosh Regalim and the counting of the Omer.[6]

The individual readings for all of the days of Sukkot are as follows:[25]

Sukkot Day 1 (weekday)
Reading 1: Leviticus 22:26-23:3
Reading 2: Leviticus 23:4-14
Reading 3: Leviticus 23:15-22
Reading 4: Leviticus 23:23-32
Reading 5: Leviticus 23:33-44
Maftir: Numbers 29:12-16
Haftarah: Zechariah 14:1-21

Sukkot Day 1 (Shabbat)
Reading 1: Leviticus 22:26-33
Reading 2: Leviticus 23:1-3
Reading 3: Leviticus 23:4-8
Reading 4: Leviticus 23:9-14
Reading 5: Leviticus 23:15-22
Reading 6: Leviticus 23:23-32
Reading 7: Leviticus 23:33-44
Maftir: Numbers 29:12-16
Haftarah: Zechariah 14:1-21

Sukkot Day 2
Reading 1: Leviticus 22:26-23:3
Reading 2: Leviticus 23:4-14
Reading 3: Leviticus 23:15-22
Reading 4: Leviticus 23:23-32
Reading 5: Leviticus 23:33-44
Maftir: Numbers 29:12-16
Haftarah: I Kings 8:2-21

Sukkot Day 3 (Chol Hamoed Day 1 when it falls out on a weekday)
Reading 1: Numbers 29:17-19
Reading 2: Numbers 29:20-22
Reading 3: Numbers 29:23-25
Reading 4: Numbers 29:17-22

Sukkot Day 4 (Chol Hamoed Day 2; it always falls out on a weekday)
Reading 1: Numbers 29:20-22
Reading 2: Numbers 29:23-25
Reading 3: Numbers 29:26-28
Reading 4: Numbers 29:20-25

Sukkot Day 5 (Chol Hamoed Day 3 when it falls out on a weekday)
Reading 1: Numbers 29:23-25
Reading 2: Numbers 29:26-28
Reading 3: Numbers 29:29-31
Reading 4: Numbers 29:23-28

Sukkot Day 6 (Chol Hamoed Day 4 when it falls out on a weekday)
Reading 1: Numbers 29:26-28
Reading 2: Numbers 29:29-31
Reading 3: Numbers 29:32-34
Reading 4: Numbers 29:26:31

Sukkot Shabbat Chol Hamoed
Reading 1: Exodus 33:12-16
Reading 2: Exodus 33:17-19
Reading 3: Exodus 33:20-23
Reading 4: Exodus 34:1-3
Reading 5: Exodus 34:4-10
Reading 6: Exodus 34:11-17
Reading 7: Exodus 34:18:26
Maftir: Numbers 29:17-22 if Shabbat falls out on the first day of Chol Hamoed.
Numbers 29:23-28 if Shabbat falls out on the third day of Chol Hamoed.
Numbers 29: 26-31 if Shabbat falls out on the fourth day of Chol Hamoed.[26]
Note: Shabbat Chol Hamoed cannot fall out on the second day of Chol Hamoed.
Haftarah: Ezekiel 38:18-39:16

Hoshana Rabbah
Reading 1: Numbers 29:26-28
Reading 2: Numbers 29:29-31
Reading 3: Numbers 29:32-34
Reading 4: Numbers 29:29-34

Shemini Atzeret/Simchat Torah[edit]

On Shemini Atzeret, Deuteronomy 14:22-16:17 is read.[27] This is also the reading for the eighth day of Passover and the second day of Shavuot (which occur only in the diaspora). When either of these days fall on a day other than Shabbat, the reading is abridged.

When the Shemini Atzeret falls out on a weekday, the individual readings are as follows:
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 14:22-15:23
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 16:1-3
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 16:4-8
Reading 4: Deuteronomy 16:9-12
Reading 5: Deuteronomy 16:13-17
Maftir: Numbers 29:35-30:1
Haftarah: I Kings 8:54-9:1

When the Shemini Atzeret falls out on Shabbat, the individual readings are as follows:
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 14:22-29
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 15:1-15:18
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 15:19-15:23
Reading 4: Deuteronomy 16:1-3
Reading 5: Deuteronomy 16:4-8
Reading 6: Deuteronomy 16:9-12
Reading 7: Deuteronomy 16:13-17
Maftir: Numbers 29:35-30:1
Haftarah: I Kings 8:54-9:1

On Simchat Torah, the Parsha of V'Zot HaBerachah is read in its entirety. The Torah is also read during Maariv services on Simchat Torah. This is the only time of year in which a Maariv Torah reading occurs. In the diaspora, where Simchat Torah is a separate day from Shemini Atzeret, Simchat Torah can never fall on Shabbat, and there is no mincha reading for Simchat Torah.

The individual readings for Simchat Torah are as follows:[13]
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 33:1-7
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 33:8-12
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 33:13-17
Reading 4: Deuteronomy 33:18-21
Reading 5: Deuteronomy 33:22-26
Reading 6: Deuteronomy 33:27-34:12 (Chatan Torah)
Reading 7: Genesis 1:1-2:3 (Chatan Bereshit) (second scroll)
Maftir: Numbers 29:35-30:1 (third scroll)
Haftarah: Joshua 1:1-18

Shabbat Chol Hamoed[edit]

When Shabbat occurs on Chol Hamoed of either Sukkot or Passover, Exodus 33:12-34:26 is read.[28] Since this is on Shabbat, it is always divided into seven readings. This reading contains the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy. The individual readings are listed with the readings for Passover and Sukkot.

High Holidays[edit]

During the Shacharit services of the High Holidays, the cantillation for the Torah reading is different from the usual cantillation that is used for Shacharit during the rest of the year.

During the Mincha service of Yom Kippur, the cantillation for the Torah reading is done in the "ordinary" mode that is used on weekdays and Shabbat during the year. The reason given for this is by this time, the congregation is already anticipating a return to normal life.[29]

Rosh Hashanah[edit]

On Day One of Rosh Hashana, Genesis 21:1-34 is read. On Day Two, the reading is Genesis 22:1-24.[30]

When the first day of Rosh Hashana falls out on a weekday, the individual readings are as follows:[30]
Reading 1: Genesis 21:1-4
Reading 2: Genesis 21:5-12
Reading 3: Genesis 21:13-21
Reading 4: Genesis 21:22-27
Reading 5: Genesis 21:28-34
Maftir: Numbers 29:1-6
Haftarah: I Samuel 1:1-2:10

When the first day of Rosh Hashana falls out on Shabbat, the individual readings are as follows:[30]
Reading 1: Genesis 21:1-4
Reading 2: Genesis 21:5-8
Reading 3: Genesis 21:9-12
Reading 4: Genesis 21:13-17
Reading 5: Genesis 21:18-21
Reading 6: Genesis 21:22-27
Reading 7: Genesis 21:28-34
Maftir: Numbers 29:1-6
Haftarah: I Samuel 1:1-2:10

The second day of Rosh Hashanah cannot occur on a Shabbat. The individual readings are as follows:[30]
Reading 1: Genesis 22:1-3
Reading 2: Genesis 22:4-8
Reading 3: Genesis 22:9-14
Reading 4: Genesis 22:15-19
Reading 5: Genesis 22:20-24
Maftir: Numbers 29:1-6
Haftarah: Jeremiah 31:1-19

Yom Kippur[edit]

The Shacharit reading comes from the parsha of Acharei Mot. It begins by describing the deaths of Nadav and Avihu, two of Aaron's sons. The purpose of reading this passage is to invoke the realization that they died for a relatively minor sin, yet the listener, upon hearing this, is supposed to think "I am full of serious sins."

When Yom Kippur falls out on a weekday, the individual readings for the morning service are as follows:[31]
Reading 1: Leviticus 16:1-6
Reading 2: Leviticus 16:7-11
Reading 3: Leviticus 16:12-17
Reading 4: Leviticus 16:18-24
Reading 5: Leviticus 16:25-30
Reading 6: Leviticus 16:31-34
Maftir: Numbers 29:7-11
Haftarah: Isaiah 57:14-58:14

When Yom Kippur falls out on Shabbat, the individual readings for the morning service are as follows:[31]
Reading 1: Leviticus 16:1-3
Reading 2: Leviticus 16:4-6
Reading 3: Leviticus 16:7-11
Reading 4: Leviticus 16:12-17
Reading 5: Leviticus 16:18-24
Reading 6: Leviticus 16:25-30
Reading 7: Leviticus 16:31-34
Maftir: Numbers 29:7-11
Haftarah: Isaiah 57:14-58:14

The Mincha reading is also read from Acharei Mot. The portion describes all the forbidden marriages and relationships.[29] The purpose of selecting this reading is to remind the Jewish people, who have just been forgiven for their sins, not to lose control and enter forbidden relationships.

The individual readings for the afternoon service of Yom Kippur are as follows (for weekday or Shabbat):[32]
Reading 1: Leviticus 18:1-5
Reading 2: Leviticus 18:6-21
Reading 3: Leviticus 18:22-30
Haftarah: Jonah 1:1-4:11, Micah 7:18-20

Other Days[edit]

Rosh Chodesh[edit]

When Rosh Chodesh falls on a weekday, Numbers 28:1-15 is read. When Rosh Chodesh falls on Shabbat, Numbers 28:9-15 is read as the Maftir.

The individual readings are as follows:
Rosh Chodesh (weekday)[33]
Reading 1: Numbers 28:1-3
Reading 2: Numbers 28:3-5 (the third verse is re-read)
Reading 3: Numbers 28:6-10
Reading 4: Numbers 28:11-15

Rosh Chodesh (Shabbat)[34]
Readings 1-7: Regular Torah reading
Maftir: Numbers 28:9-15
Haftarah: Isiah 66:1-24

Note: when Rosh Chodesh occurs on a Sunday, the regular Haftarah of the preceding day is replaced with the Machar Hachodesh (literally, "tomorrow is the new month") Haftarah, I Samuel 20:18-42.[35]

Chanukah[edit]

The readings for the eight days of Chanukah that fall out on weekdays come from Numbers Chapter 7. Each passage describes one of the eight days of the dedication ceremony of the Mishkan. During most years, only 1 Shabbat occurs during Chanukah, and the regularly scheduled Shabbat Torah reading is done. When Shabbat falls out on the first day of Chanukah, a second Shabbat will occur on the eighth day, and the regularly scheduled Torah reading for that day is done as well.

The sixth day of Chanukah is always Rosh Chodesh for the month of Tevet. Due to the mechanics of the Hebrew calendar, the month of Tevet often has a two-day Rosh Chodesh; in those years, the seventh day of Chanukah is the second day of Rosh Chodesh Tevet.

On "ordinary" days of Chanukah, one Torah scroll is used. On the days of Chanukah that coincide with Rosh Chodesh or Shabbat, two Torah scrolls are used. On those years when the sixth day (Rosh Chodesh) also falls out on Shabbat, three Torah scrolls are used.

The individual readings are as follows:[36]
Chanukah Day 1, 2, 3, 4, or 7 when it coincides with the first Shabbat
Readings 1-7: Regular Torah Reading
Maftir: Numbers 7:1-17
Haftarah: Zechariah 2:14-4:7

Chanukah Day 1 (weekday) Numbers 7:1-17
Reading 1: Numbers 7:1-11
Reading 2: Numbers 7:12-14
Reading 3: Numbers 7:15-17

Chanukah Day 2 (weekday) Numbers 7:18-29
Reading 1: Numbers 7:18-20
Reading 2: Numbers 7:21-23
Reading 3: Numbers 7:24-29

Chanukah Day 3 (weekday) Numbers 7:24-35
Reading 1: Numbers 7:24-26
Reading 2: Numbers 7:27-29
Reading 3: Numbers 7:30-35

Chanukah Day 4 (weekday) Numbers 7:30-41
Reading 1: Numbers 7:30-32
Reading 2: Numbers 7:33-35
Reading 3: Numbers 7:36-41

Chanukah Day 5 (always on a weekday) Numbers 7:36-47
Reading 1: Numbers 7:36-38
Reading 2: Numbers 7:39-41
Reading 3: Numbers 7:42-47

Chanukah Day 6 (weekday, always Rosh Chodesh) Numbers 28:1-15
Reading 1: Numbers 28:1-5 (Rosh Chodesh Torah reading)
Reading 2: Numbers 28:6-10 (Rosh Chodesh Torah reading)
Reading 3: Numbers 28:11-15 (Rosh Chodesh Torah reading)
Reading 4: Numbers 7:42-47 (second scroll)
Note: Four readings are done on Rosh Chodesh days throughout the year.

Chanukah Day 6 (Shabbat, always Rosh Chodesh)[37]
Readings 1-6: Regular Torah Reading; it is divided into six aliyot instead of the usual seven
Reading 7: Numbers 28:9-15 (second scroll)
Maftir: Numbers 7:42-47 (third scroll)
Haftarah: Zechariah 2:14-4:7 (First Shabbat Chanukah Haftarah)

Chanukah Day 7 (weekday, but not Rosh Chodesh) Numbers 7:48-59
Reading 1: Numbers 7:48-50
Reading 2: Numbers 7:51-53
Reading 3: Numbers 7:54-59

Chanukah Day 7 (weekday, Rosh Chodesh) Numbers 28:1-15
Reading 1: Numbers 28:1-5 (Rosh Chodesh Torah reading)
Reading 2: Numbers 28:6-10 (Rosh Chodesh Torah reading)
Reading 3: Numbers 28:11-15 (Rosh Chodesh Torah reading)
Maftir: Numbers 7:48-53 (second scroll)
Note: Four readings are done on Rosh Chodesh days throughout the year.

Chanukah Day 8 (weekday) Numbers 7:54-8:4
Reading 1: Numbers 7:54-56
Reading 2: Numbers 7:57-59
Reading 3: Numbers 7:60-8:4

Chanukah Day 8 (Second Shabbat)
Readings 1-7: Regular Torah Reading
Maftir: Numbers 7:54-8:4
Haftarah: I Kings 7:40-50

Note: the fifth day of Chanukah never falls out on Shabbat. Any other day of Chanukah can occur on a weekday or Shabbat.
Note: the maftir for the eighth day of Chanukah is the longest maftir of the year (40 sentences). It is not read every year; it is only read when the first day and eighth day of the holiday both occur on Shabbat.

Purim[edit]

On Purim, Exodus 17:8-16 is read, which describes Israel's war with Amalek. The individual readings are as follows:[38]
Reading 1: Exodus 17:8-10
Reading 2: Exodus 17:11-13
Reading 3: Exodus 17:14-16
Note: this Torah reading is only 9 sentences long, and it is the briefest Torah reading of the year. The regular weekday Torah readings that occur on Monday and Thursday Shacharit services are 10 sentences.

Public fast days[edit]

On the Fast of Gedalia, the Fast of the Tenth of Tevet, the Fast of Esther, and the Fast of the Seventeenth of Tammuz, Exodus 32:11-14 and 34:1-10 are read during both Shacharit and Mincha services. This is also read for the Mincha service of Tisha B'Av. At the Shacharit service of Tisha B'Av, Deuteronomy 4:25-40 is read. The individual readings are as follows:[13]
Reading 1: Exodus 32:11-14
Reading 2: Exodus 34:1-3
Reading 3: Exodus 34:4-10
Haftarah: Isaiah 55:6-56:8 (the Haftarah is read only during the Mincha service)

The individual readings for Shacharit on Tisha B'Av is as follows:[39]
Reading 1: Deuteronomy 4:25-29
Reading 2: Deuteronomy 4:30-35
Reading 3: Deuteronomy 4:36-40
Haftarah: Jeremiah 8:13-9:23

The Four Parshiyot[edit]

These are four special Shabbats that derive their name from the additional Torah portion that is read when they occur each year. Two are before Purim and two are after Purim (although they usually do not occur on 4 consecutive weeks). Shabbat Hagadol occurs after this grouping on the Shabbat immediately before Passover; it is distinguished only by a special Haftarah.

Shabbat Shekalim occurs on the Shabbat immediately before Rosh Chodesh Adar, or on Rosh Chodesh Adar when the Rosh Chodesh coincides with Shabbat. It is named for the contents of the maftir reading, which describes the census requiring every Israelite man to contribute a half shekel to support communal sacrifices in the Tabernacle and later at the Temple in Jerusalem. When Rosh Chodesh Adar falls on a weekday, the individual readings for Shabbat Shekalim are as follows:
Readings 1-7: Regular Torah Reading
Maftir: Exodus 30:11-16
Haftarah: II Kings 11:17-12:17

When Rosh Chodesh Adar falls on Shabbat, the individual readings for Shabbat Shekalim are as follows (done from three scrolls):[40]
Readings 1-6: Regular Torah Reading (it is divided into six aliyot instead of the usual seven)
Reading 7: Numbers 28:9-15 (second scroll). This is the maftir that is usually read on Rosh Chodesh.
Maftir: Exodus 30:11-16 (third scroll)
Haftarah: II Kings 11:17-12:17

Shabbat Zachor occurs on the Shabbat immediately prior to Purim. It is also is named for the maftir reading, which is an admonition to remember the nation of Amalek, who surprised the Israelites when they were wandering in the desert with a rear attack on the weakest and feeblest of the people.
Readings 1-7: Regular Torah Reading
Maftir: Deuteronomy 25:17-19
Haftarah: I Samuel 15:1-34

Shabbat Parah occurs on the Shabbat immediately after Purim. It is also is named for the maftir reading, which deals with the ceremony of the red heifer, whose ashes were combined with water to ritually purify anyone who had been in contact with a dead person. The individual readings are as follows.
Readings 1-7: Regular Torah Reading
Maftir: Numbers 19:1-22
Haftarah: Ezekiel 36:16-38

Shabbat HaChodesh occurs the Shabbat immediately before Rosh Chodesh Nisan, or on Rosh Chodesh Nisan when the Rosh Chodesh coincides with Shabbat. Shabbat HaChodesh means "Sabbath of the month", and it occurs before the first month of the year of the Hebrew calendar, during which Passover occurs. When Rosh Chodesh Nisan falls on a weekday, the individual readings are as follows:
Readings 1-7: Regular Torah Reading
Maftir: Exodus 12:1-20
Haftarah Ezekiel 45:16-46:18

When Rosh Chodesh Nisan falls on Shabbat, the individual readings for Parshat Hachodesh are as follows (done from 3 scrolls):[41] Readings 1-6: Regular Torah Reading (it is divided into six aliyot instead of the usual seven)
Reading 7: Numbers 28:9-15 (second scroll). This is the maftir that is usually read on Rosh Chodesh.
Maftir: Exodus 12:1-20 (third scroll)
Haftarah: Ezekiel 45:16-46:18

Finally, Shabbat Hagadol occurs on the Shabbat immediately before Passover. The regular Torah readings and regular Maftir are done. Only the Haftarah is different: Malachi 3:4-24

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The book of customs: a complete ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2006-08-24. Retrieved 2011-03-28. 
  2. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur, page 954
  3. ^ "Torah Readings - Study & History - Passover". Chabad.org. Retrieved 2011-03-28. 
  4. ^ a b Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 496–498. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  5. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 498–501. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Passover Torah Readings - Festivals & Special Readings - Parsha". Chabad.org. Retrieved 2011-03-28. 
  7. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. p. 502. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  8. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. p. 503. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  9. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. p. 504. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  10. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. p. 505. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  11. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 506–509. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  12. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur, page 962
  13. ^ a b c d Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 509–513. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  14. ^ a b Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 513–517. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  15. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur, page 966
  16. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 520–523. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  17. ^ a b Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 523–527. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  18. ^ a b The Complete Artscroll Siddur, page 969
  19. ^ The narrow bridge: beyond the Holocaust - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2011-03-28. 
  20. ^ Macy Nulman, The Encyclopedia of Jewish Prayer (1993, NJ: Jason Aronson) s.v. "Yetziv Pitgam" page 375.
  21. ^ Philip Birnbaum, Prayer Book for the Three Festivals (1971, NY, Hebrew Publ'g Co.) page 309.
  22. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur, op.cit., page 969, which translates the last verse literally as "To Yehonasan, the epitome of humility, let us extend gracious praise" - but the same publisher and apparently the same translators and editors, in The Complete ArtScroll Machzor: Shavuous (1995) page 529, - and Philip Birnbaum, Prayer Book for the Three Festivals (1971, NY, Hebrew Publishing Co.) page 310, and Emanuel Green, Service of the Synagogue: Pentecost (1928, NY, Hebrew Publ'g Co.) page 204 - evidently squeeze the familiar name for its etymological meaning, namely "God has given", and so translate this line, "God gave [the tablets] to the meekest of men [namely Moses], so let us ..."
  23. ^ Macy Nulman, The Encyclopedia of Jewish Prayer (1993, NJ: Jason Aronson) s.v. "Yetziv Pitgam" page 375.
  24. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur, page 956
  25. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. p. 471-4480. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  26. ^ De Sola Pool, Rabbi David (1960). The Traditional Prayer Book for Sabbath and Festivals. New York: Behrman House. pp. 811–814. 
  27. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur, pages 964-974
  28. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur, page 960
  29. ^ a b The Jewish way: living the holidays - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2011-03-28. 
  30. ^ a b c d Scherman, Rabbi Nosson (1985). The Complete Artscroll Machzor Rosh Hashanah. Brooklyn, NY: Mesorah Publications. pp. 402–424. ISBN 0-89906-676-3. 
  31. ^ a b Scherman, Rabbi Nosson (1985). The Complete Artscroll Machzor Yom Kippur. Brooklyn, NY: Mesorah Publications. pp. 452–464. ISBN 0-89906-676-3. 
  32. ^ Scherman, Rabbi Nosson (1985). The Complete Artscroll Machzor Yom Kippur. Brooklyn, NY: Mesorah Publications. pp. 630–647. ISBN 0-89906-676-3. 
  33. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. p. 468. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  34. ^ "hebcal.com". 
  35. ^ "hebcal.com". 
  36. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 490–495. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  37. ^ "dailyhalacha.com". 
  38. ^ Mangel, Rabbi Nissen (2007). Siddur Tehillat Hashem. Brooklyn, NY: Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch. pp. 495–496. ISBN 978-0-8266-0153-7. 
  39. ^ "Shacharit for Tisha b’Av". 
  40. ^ "wikisource". 
  41. ^ [source http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Arukh_ha-Shulchan/Orach_Chaim/685 "wikisource"].