Toronto Falcons

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This article is about the soccer team from the 1960s; for the professional hockey team from the 1920s, see Toronto Ravinas.
Toronto Falcons
logo
Full name Toronto Falcons
Nickname(s) The Falcons
Founded 1967
Dissolved 1968
Stadium Varsity Stadium,
Toronto, Canada
Stadium
capacity
22,000
Chairman Joseph Peters
Manager Ladislav Kubala
League NPSL (1967)
NASL (1968)
1967/68 NASL Western Division, 4th

The Toronto Falcons were a soccer team based in Toronto, Canada. They played only two years, 1967 in the National Professional Soccer League (NPSL) and 1968 in the North American Soccer League (NASL). Their home field was Varsity Stadium.

During the 1967 season, while still in the NPSL, the Falcons drew an average of 3,792 people per game. Toronto's record for the 1967 season was a bearable 10-5-17. The following season, the NPSL merged with the United Soccer Association to form the NASL.[1][2] Their intercity rival, Toronto City, of USL folded in the process after only one year.[3]

In the NASL, with the legendary Ladislav Kubala as their coach, the Falcons played well collecting a 13-6-13 record, but financial troubles caused the club (along with 11 others) to fold. Their average attendance for the 1968 season was 5,336 people per game.

Year-by-year[edit]

Year League W L T Pts Reg. Season Playoffs
1967 NPSL 10 17 5 127 4th, Western Division Did not qualify
1968 NASL 13 13 6 144 3rd, Lakes Division Did not qualify

Players[edit]

During the 1967 season, the Falcons were able to sign Bill Brown a Scottish goalkeeper who drew 28 caps in his career. Tony Lecce was a defender and Canadian international. Defender Guglielmo Burelli played over 150 games in the Serie A, including one season for Juventus F.C. Other players worth noting are Iris DeBrito and Yanko Daucik both prolific goal scorers, and John Lima from the first spanish league. The team became something of a family affair with the addition of Daucik's brother in law László Kubala (player/coach) and nephew Branko Kubala to the squad, not to mention Yanko's father Ferdinand Daučík served as the head coach.[4]

Coaches[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Waring, Ed (1967-12-08). "Pro soccer merger hinges on unified Toronto team". Globe and Mail. 
  2. ^ Waring, Ed (1967-12-13). "Falcons' boss insists he has sole ownership of merged franchise". Globe and Mail. 
  3. ^ "20 cities picked for soccer loop". New York Times. 1967-12-14. 
  4. ^ http://www.nasljerseys.com/Rosters/Falcons_Rosters.htm#1967