Totowa, New Jersey

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Totowa, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Totowa
Map of Totowa in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Totowa in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Totowa, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Totowa, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°54′12″N 74°13′17″W / 40.903266°N 74.221372°W / 40.903266; -74.221372Coordinates: 40°54′12″N 74°13′17″W / 40.903266°N 74.221372°W / 40.903266; -74.221372[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated March 15, 1898
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor John Coiro (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Joseph Wassel[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 4.065 sq mi (10.528 km2)
 • Land 3.994 sq mi (10.345 km2)
 • Water 0.071 sq mi (0.183 km2)  1.74%
Area rank 294th of 566 in state
8th of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 262 ft (80 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 10,804
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 10,932
 • Rank 225th of 566 in state
12th of 16 in county[11]
 • Density 2,704.9/sq mi (1,044.4/km2)
 • Density rank 230th of 566 in state
10th of 16 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07502, 07511, 07512[12][13]
Area code(s) 973[14]
FIPS code 3403173140[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885420[17][2]
Website www.totowanj.org

Totowa (pronounced "TO-tuh-wuh"[18] /ˈttəwə/) is a borough in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 10,844,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 912 (+9.2%) from the 9,892 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 285 (-2.8%) from the 10,177 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Totowa was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 15, 1898, from portions of the now-defunct Manchester Township and Wayne Township.[20] The name Totowa comes from the Native American name for the Passaic Falls, and literally means sinking or "falling water" Also means, between mountains and water.[21][22]

Geography[edit]

Totowa is located at 40°54′12″N 74°13′17″W / 40.903266°N 74.221372°W / 40.903266; -74.221372 (40.903266,-74.221372). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 4.065 square miles (10.528 km2), of which, 3.994 square miles (10.345 km2) of it is land and 0.071 square miles (0.183 km2) of it (1.74%) is water.[2][1]

History[edit]

In 1696, George Willocks, a Scottish land speculator, purchased a tract of land known as Willock's Patent, which included most of modern day Totowa Borough. Located in the western part of Manchester Township, Willocks Patent was resold to Anthony Brockholls and the Van Houtens. The land was titled the "Totowa Patent," and divided into three parcels. The Totowa Patent and land acquired through the "Garret Mountain Purchase" included modern-day Totowa, Woodland Park (formerly West Paterson) and Little Falls.[23]

In 1895, residents of the southern section of Manchester Township began to become disenchanted with governing officials, and following the election of 1896, many independent municipalities were formed. The formation of the Borough of Totowa was discussed at the Willard Park Hotel on Totowa Avenue, and headed by brothers Joseph and Robert Boyle. On March 15, 1898, the Borough of Totowa was officially incorporated under Chapter 56 of the Laws of New Jersey, signed by Governor John Griggs.[20] On April 12, 1898, the first election of the Borough of Totowa was held at the Willard Park Hotel, which would become the unofficial town hall, until the municipal building was completed in 1910.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 562
1910 1,130 101.1%
1920 1,864 65.0%
1930 4,600 146.8%
1940 5,130 11.5%
1950 6,045 17.8%
1960 10,897 80.3%
1970 11,580 6.3%
1980 11,448 −1.1%
1990 10,177 −11.1%
2000 9,892 −2.8%
2010 10,804 9.2%
Est. 2012 10,932 [10] 1.2%
Population sources: 1900-1920[25]
1900-1910[26] 1900-1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,804 people, 3,783 households, and 2,826 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,704.9 per square mile (1,044.4 /km2). There were 3,918 housing units at an average density of 980.9 per square mile (378.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.44% (9,231) White, 2.30% (248) Black or African American, 0.10% (11) Native American, 5.92% (640) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 4.22% (456) from other races, and 2.02% (218) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 14.35% (1,550) of the population.[7]

There were 3,783 households of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.8% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.19.[7]

In the borough, 20.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 29.4% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years. For every 100 females there were 94.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.8 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $72,568 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,834) and the median family income was $82,750 (+/- $13,865). Males had a median income of $58,750 (+/- $10,202) versus $42,641 (+/- $10,936) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,978 (+/- $4,380). About 4.3% of families and 9.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.8% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Same-sex couples headed 25 households in 2010, almost double the 13 counted in 2000.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 9,892 people, 3,539 households, and 2,643 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,474.8 people per square mile (954.8/km²). There were 3,630 housing units at an average density of 908.2 per square mile (350.4/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.40% White, 1.12% African American, 0.02% Native American, 2.26% Asian, 1.97% from other races, and 1.22% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.37% of the population.[29][30]

As of the 2000 Census, 37.2% of town residents were of Italian ancestry, the seventh-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States, and second-highest in New Jersey (behind Hammonton, at 45.9%), among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.[33]

There were 3,539 households out of which 26.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.3% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.09.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 18.3% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 21.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 89.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.6 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $60,408, and the median income for a family was $69,354. Males had a median income of $44,462 versus $33,869 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,561. About 0.8% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Economics[edit]

Among companies based in Totowa is Big M, a privately held American clothing retailer which operates under the brands Mandee, Annie Sez and Afaze. Big M filed for bankruptcy in 2013, precipitated by damage from Hurricane Sandy.[34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Totowa is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Totowa is John Coiro, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Totowa Borough Council are Council President Phil Puglise (R, 2014), Debbie Andriani (R, 2014), Lou D'Angelo (R, 2013), Carolyn Fontanella (R, 2015), Anthony Picarelli (R, 2015) and John Waryas (R, 2013).[35][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Totowa is located in the 11th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 40th state legislative district.[8][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Totowa had been in the 35th state legislative district.[42] Prior to the 2010 Census, Totowa had been part of the 8th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[42]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[46][47]

The 40th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Kevin J. O'Toole (R, Cedar Grove) and in the General Assembly by Scott Rumana (R, Wayne) and David C. Russo (R, Ridgewood).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected to staggered three-year terms office on an at-large basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[51] As of 2013, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce James (D, term ends December 31, 2014; Clifton),[52] Freeholder Deputy Director Theodore O. Best Jr. (D, 2014; Paterson),[53] John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne), Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood), Terry Duffy (D, 2013; West Milford),[54] Pat Lepore (D, 2013; Woodland Park)[55] and Hector C. Lora (D, 2015; Passaic).[56][57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (2014),[58] Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik[59] and Surrogate Bernice Toledo.[60]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,950 registered voters in Totowa, of which 1,355 (19.5% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,562 (36.9% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 3,030 (43.6% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[61] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 64.3% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 80.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[61][62]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,118 votes here (58.0% vs. 37.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,026 votes (37.7% vs. 58.8%) and other candidates with 63 votes (1.2% vs. 0.8%), among the 5,375 ballots cast by the borough's 7,013 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.6% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County).[63] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,981 votes here (57.1% vs. 42.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,029 votes (38.8% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 24 votes (0.5% vs. 0.7%), among the 5,224 ballots cast by the borough's 6,686 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.1% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).[64]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,299 votes here (60.3% vs. 43.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,236 votes (32.4% vs. 50.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 142 votes (3.7% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 29 votes (0.8% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,811 ballots cast by the borough's 6,967 registered voters, yielding a 54.7% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).[65]

Emergency services[edit]

Police[edit]

The Borough of Totowa Police Department (TBPD), located within the Totowa Municipal Building on Totowa Road, is responsible for law enforcement.[66]

Fire[edit]

The Totowa Fire Department (TFD) is an entirely volunteer fire department and was established in April 1908.[67] The TFD consists of four "companies," which include; Volunteer Fire Company #1 (1908), Lincoln Fire Company (1908), Riverview Fire Company #3 (1925), and Fire Rescue Company #4 (1955). The TFD consists of 98 volunteer firefighters.[68]

Ambulance[edit]

The Borough of Totowa First Aid Squad was founded in 1951 to provide a free, volunteer based service to the residents of Totowa. The Borough of Totowa First Aid Squad Auxiliary was also formed to help raise funds to support and benefit the first aid squad.[69]

Office of Emergency Management[edit]

The Borough of Totowa OEM is responsible for organizing, aiding, and providing emergency response units in the case of a "state of local disaster emergency."[70] The OEM recruits volunteers of various disciplines to respond to local disasters and collaborates with both county and state officials in the event of a disaster.

Transportation[edit]

Totowa is located on several major roadways, including Interstate 80 and U.S. Route 46. Nearby roadways include New Jersey Route 23, New Jersey Route 3, and the Garden State Parkway. Totowa is also crisscrossed by several Passaic County Routes, including New Jersey Route 62, CR 632, CR 642 and CR 644.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 193 and 197 routes, and local service on the 712 route. Train service is available on the Montclair-Boonton Line at the Towaco station.[71]

Education[edit]

Public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade are educated by the Totowa Borough Public Schools. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[72]) are Memorial School which houses students in prekindergarten through second grade (327 students) and Washington Park School for grades three through eight (653).[73]

For grades 9 - 12, students in public school attend Passaic Valley Regional High School. The regional public high school serves students from Little Falls, Totowa, and Woodland Park (formerly West Paterson). The school facility is located in Little Falls.[74]

Academy of St. Francis of Assisi is a K-8 Catholic school that operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson.[75]

Sports[edit]

Recreational sports are offered through The Totowa Police Athletic League (P.A.L.), a volunteer organization that offers several sports to the children of Totowa from pre-kindergarten to eighth grade. Established in 1952, the P.A.L. strives to provide children throughout the borough with the fellowship of sports. These sports include baseball, softball, basketball, soccer, football, hockey, and cheerleading. Although the Totowa P.A.L. is independent from the Borough of Totowa, it uses fields and facilities owned by the municipality. Meetings, registrations, and events are held at the P.A.L. building, built in 1963 and located on Chamberlain Avenue.

In 1961-62, the New York Gladiators of the short-lived National Bowling League rolled its home matches at "Gladiator Arena", a converted movie theater in Totowa.[76]

Points of interest[edit]

  • Annie's Road is a section of Riverview Drive between Totowa Road and Union Boulevard, which is rumored to be haunted by the ghost of a young woman killed in an accident.[77]
  • Dey Mansion is a colonial house where General George Washington took residence during the Revolutionary War. The house gives tours of all the artifacts and furniture left there and has a genuine blacksmith shop that makes clothes hooks and horse shoes for visitors. It is located on 199 Totowa Road, Wayne. Even though located in Wayne, Totowa residents believe that it is truly located in Totowa because it is barely past the border of the two towns.[78]
  • Totowa is home to three extensive luxury home developments: Dey Hill Farms, Arlington Estates, and Hickory Hill. Dey Hill Farms, the largest of the developments was established in 1974 and received its name from The Dey Mansion located down the road. The development has been expanded since 1974, with the additions of Columbus Avenue, Flintlock Court, Liberty Ridge Extension, Centennial Court and Mountainview Court. A large tract of land within the development known as the Boonstra Parcel remains undeveloped.[citation needed]
  • Totowa is home to the North Jersey Developmental Center, which serves 400 developmentally disabled citizens on its 188-acre (0.76 km2) campus.[79] The state announced a plan that would close the center in Totowa and another in Woodbridge Township, as part of a plan in which residents of the centers would be dispersed to smaller, community-based housing programs.[80]
  • There are more dead people than living in Totowa, as the borough includes four active cemeteries: Holy Sepulchre Roman Catholic Cemetery,[81] Laurel Grove Memorial Park, Mount Nebo Jewish Cemetery, and the A.M. White Lodge Jewish Cemetery.[citation needed]
  • The headquarters of Greater Community Bancorp was located here. The bank operated 16 branches in North Jersey until its 2008 acquisition by Valley National Bank.[82]

Media and culture[edit]

Totowa is located within the New York media market, with most of its daily papers available for sale or delivery. The area is also served by The Record and The Star-Ledger, which cover northern New Jersey.

A segment of the April 12, 2013 episode of the American version of the reality television series Undercover Boss was filmed in Totowa. In the segment, Tony Wells, the CMO for the home security provider ADT, visits Totowa to pose as a new employee being trained as a local sales representative for that company.[83]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Totowa include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Phone Directory, Borough of Totowa. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 151.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Totowa, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Totowa borough, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 16. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Totowa borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 11, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Totowa, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 24, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Totowa, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 31, 2013.
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  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 16, 2012.
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  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  20. ^ a b "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606–1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 211. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  21. ^ Chadwick, A. F. "In the Dayd of Early Paterson. Origin and Progress of the Silk City of America. Told for Little People", The Sunday Chronicle (Paterson)', April 1, 1906. Accessed August 16, 2012. "They called the falls Totowa, which means the great falling-water."
  22. ^ Ruttenberg, Edward Manning. History of the Indian tribes of Hudson's River: their origin, manners and customs, p. 376.
  23. ^ Nelson, William; and Shriner, Charles Anthony. History of Paterson and its Environs (The Silk City), p. 116. Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1920. "The Totowa Patent embraced nearly all of what is now the First Ward of Paterson, all of what is now the Second Ward of Paterson and a great deal of what was afterwards Manchester township."
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  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Totowa borough, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  32. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed January 15, 2012.
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  34. ^ Stephanie Gleason (January 8, 2013), "Mandee's Owner Big M Files for Chapter 11, Hurt by Sandy", The Wall Street Journal: B2 
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  53. ^ Theodore O. Best Jr., Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Terry Duffy, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Pat Lepore, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Patberg, Zach. "Democrats take full control of Passaic County freeholder board", The Record (Bergen County), January 4, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Ronda Casson Cotroneo, a family law attorney, wants [to] establish a program that links lawyers and counselors with victims of domestic violence. John Bartlett, also a lawyer, imagines more parks, calling them the county’s 'undiscovered gem.'... Lora, a Passaic city councilman, says better communication with constituents is the key to good government, whether through handshakes or social media."
  58. ^ County Clerk, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ Richard H. Berdnik, Passaic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 9, 2013.
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  68. ^ firedepartments.net:Totowa. Accessed April 7, 2009.
  69. ^ Home page, Boro of Totowa First Aid Squad. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  70. ^ NJ Office of Emergency Management. Accessed April 7, 2009.
  71. ^ Passaic County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 16, 2012.
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  73. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Totowa Borough Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 11, 2013.
  74. ^ District Information, Passaic Valley High School. Accessed August 16, 2012. "The regional district which is served by Passaic Valley High School is comprised of the communities of Little Falls, Totowa Borough and Woodland Park."
  75. ^ Passaic County Elementary Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed October 31, 2011.
  76. ^ Lardner, Rex. "Bowling's Big League—a $14 Million Dollar Gamble: Hyped-up rules, new lanes and new gimmicks make bowling a novel spectator sport prospect", Sports Illustrated, October 30, 1961. Accessed March 22, 2011. "The bowlers warmed up. Some of the crowd ooed and aahed at the big hook of the New York Gladiators' young Johnny Meyer, a left-hander, and at the power of the Dallas Broncos' J.B. Solomon.... Unable to find a home on top of Manhattan's Grand Central Station, where it had hoped to perch like a city pigeon, the New York team finally landed in a new stadium at Totowa, N.J."
  77. ^ Archilla, Dylan. "Eccentric explorers Two New Jerseyans have made a career of discovering the state's 'weird' landmarks", Hudson Reporter, March 10, 2005. Accessed August 16, 2012. "During a recent visit to the White Manna, a customer sitting at the counter shouted, 'Tell the authors to take Annie's Road out of the book!' The man turned out to be an officer in the Totowa Police Department. He said he was tired of 'the crazies' coming out to look at 'Annie's Road,' otherwise known as Riverview Drive in Totowa. Legend says the road is haunted by the ghost of a girl who was hit and dragged by a truck."
  78. ^ Dey Mansion, Passaic County, New Jersey.
  79. ^ North Jersey Developmental Center, New Jersey Department of Human Services Division of Developmental Disabilities. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  80. ^ Noda, Stephanie. "Fighting to keep developmental centers open, Englewood man seeks council support", The Record (Bergen County), August 1, 2013. Accessed August 24, 2013. "A state task force issued a binding decision to close Totowa's North Jersey Development Center and the Woodbridge Development Center in Middlesex County in August. The decision leaves the state with five open developmental centers. The state will redirect the funding toward community housing."
  81. ^ Laurel Grove Cemetery Totowa, New Jersey. Accessed April 5, 2009.
  82. ^ Staff. "Valley National Bancorp to Acquire Greater Community Bancorp", Reuters, March 19, 2008. Accessed August 11, 2013. "Greater Community is a financial holding company headquartered in Totowa,New Jersey. Greater Community operates 16 full-service branches in thenorthern New Jersey counties of Bergen, Passaic and Morris through its state-chartered commercial bank subsidiary Greater Community Bank."
  83. ^ "ADT". Undercover Boss. Season 4. Episode 13. April 12, 2013. CBS.
  84. ^ Beeson, Ed. "EXCLUSIVE: Burress involved in domestic disputes", The Record (Bergen County), September 24, 2008. Accessed November 16, 2008. "Totowa police responded to two domestic disturbance calls at Giants receiver Plaxico Burress’s home the past few months, borough police Chief Robert Coyle confirmed today."
  85. ^ Nash, Margo. "Memories Linger Of a 'Baaad Boy' From Paterson", The New York Times, March 24, 2002. Accessed April 21, 2008. "'I tell you, he loved this town,' said Mr. Duva, who now lives in Totowa. 'He loved his people, and he loved good people.'"
  86. ^ "Arrests shine spotlight on an unknown crime fighter". The Star-Ledger. 2009-08-02. Retrieved 2009-08-03. 
  87. ^ Lee, Jennifer 8. "Obituary: John Spencer, 'West Wing' actor", International Herald Tribune, December 19, 2005. Accessed June 9, 2007. "Spencer was born on Dec. 20, 1946, in New York City to John and Mildred Speshock, a truck driver and a waitress, and grew up in Totowa, N.J."
  88. ^ Shapiro, T. Rees, via Washington Post News Service. "Totowa's Hubert Sumlin, influential blues guitarist, dies at 80", The Record (Bergen County), December 7, 2011. Accessed December 7, 2011. "Born in Greenwood, Miss., Mr. Sumlin lived in Milwaukee for most of his life before moving to Totowa 10 years ago."

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