Tour de Pologne

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Tour de Pologne
Race details
Date August
Region Poland
English name Tour of Poland
Local name(s) Wyścig Dookoła Polski (Polish)
Discipline Road race
Competition UCI World Tour
Type Stage-race
History
First edition 1928 (1928)
Editions 70 (as of 2013)
First winner  Feliks Więcek (POL)
Most wins  Dariusz Baranowski (POL)
 Marian Więckowski (POL)
(3 wins)
Most recent  Pieter Weening (NED)
The peloton in the 2004 Tour of Poland.

The Tour de Pologne (French for "Tour of Poland"), official abbreviation TdP, is a road bicycle racing stage race. It consists of seven or eight stages and is usually around 1,200 km in length. The race was first held in 1928. Until 1952 the race was held sporadically, but since then it has been an annual race. Until early 1993 the race was open to amateur cyclists only and most of its winners came from Poland.

The international cycling association, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), made TdP part of the UCI ProTour in 2005, and part of the UCI World Ranking calendar in 2009.

History[edit]

The initial concept of the TdP's multi-stage format was modeled after the popular Tour de France. The proposal for organizing the event was submitted jointly by the Warsaw Cycling Society and the Przegląd Sportowy sports newspaper published in Kraków. Thanks to their initiative, a Wyścig Dookoła Polski (Race Around Poland, the original name of the TdP) was held in the summer of 1928 . The historic first edition of the race took place on 7–11 September 1928. 71 cyclists rode almost 1,500 km — the winner was Felix Więcek from the Bydgoszcz Cycling Club.

Until the outbreak of World War II, the TdP took place four times, two of which — in the years 1937 and 1939 - were won by the "Tiger of the Roads" - Bolesław Napierała.

The early races differed significantly from today's. The stages were much longer (often a distance of 300 km), and riders repeatedly caught flat tires on stone-chipped roads, and made stops at local restaurants.

After the war, the idea of a cycling competition around Poland was reborn. In 1947, thanks to the cooperation of the Polish Cycling Association, the publishing house "Czytelnik" and a group of journalists, the race was reactivated after an 8-year break. The winner after just four stages and only 606 km (the shortest route in the history of the TdP) was Stanislaw Grzelak (Tramwajarz Lodz). Until 1993 it was not possible for the organizers of TdP to achieve an adequate rank for their event. This was due to the official stance of the authorities and the favoring of a different cycling event — the Peace Race. Noteworthy moments from that time period: triumphs of foreign cyclists — Francesco Locatelli (1949), Roger Diercken (1960), José Viejo (1972) and André Delcroix (from 1974), the longest edition of the race - 2,311 km and 13 stages (in 1953) and the hat-trick of victories of Marian Wieckowski (1954–56), matched only by Dariusz Baranowski (1991–93).

Since 1993, Czesław Lang the 1980 Summer Olympics cycling silver medalist and the winner of the 1980 TdP took over the function of TdP Director. Thanks to his persistent efforts, the TdP is now a UCI World Ranking event.

In 1997, during the UCI congress in San Sebastian, TdP advanced to the professional category of 2.4, and was now classified as a "National Race" (first of its kind in Central and Eastern European countries).

In at the 1999 World Championships in Verona, the UCI Technical Commission promoted the race to Class 2.3. In 12 October 2001 the Tour was promoted to category 2.2.

In the 2005 decision of the UCI, the TdP has been included in the elite of cycling events — the UCI ProTour. The composition of the sample were three Grand Tours: Giro d'Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, classic World Cup, staged races 2.HC category (i.e. Paris–Nice, Tour de Suisse), the classics 1.HC (i.e. La Flèche Wallonne - The Walloon Arrow) and the TdP, which was advanced by 2 categories to 2HC.

Over several years the activities of Polish precursor professional law enforcement — Czeslaw Lang, Kolarska amateur event, known in the mainly communist countries, has been transformed into a well-organized professional race. This resulted in the groups with the top stars of professional cycling and the world, even Danilo Di Luca (ProTour winner 2005), Laurent Brochard (professional world champion from 1997), Óscar Freire (world champion 1999, 2001 and 2004), Romāns Vainšteins (world champion from 2000), Viatcheslav Ekimov (Olympic Champion of 2000), Gianluca Bortolami (World Cup winner 1994), Erik Dekker (World Cup winner 2001), Stefano Garzelli (winner of 2000 Giro d'Italia) or excellent sprinters: Andrus Auga, Baden Cooke, and Daniele Bennati.

Tour de Pologne four received the title of "Best Sport Event of the Year" in the Przegląd Sportowy polls in 1995, 1996, 2004 and 2008.

List of winners[edit]

Year Winner Nationality Stages Distance
2013 Pieter Weening  Netherlands 7 1238 km
2012 Moreno Moser  Italy 7 1231.6 km
2011 Peter Sagan  Slovakia 7 1113.3 km
2010 Daniel Martin  Ireland 7 1256.5 km
2009 Alessandro Ballan  Italy 7 1158 km
2008 Jens Voigt  Germany 7 1258.6 km
2007 Johan Van Summeren  Belgium 7 1224 km
2006 Stefan Schumacher  Germany 7 1226 km
2005 Kim Kirchen  Luxembourg 8 1246 km
2004 Ondřej Sosenka  Czech Republic 8 1264 km
2003 Cezary Zamana  Poland 8 1133 km
2002 Laurent Brochard  France 8 1273 km
2001 Ondřej Sosenka  Czech Republic 8 1249 km
2000 Piotr Przydział  Poland 7 1164 km
1999 Tomasz Brożyna  Poland 7 1164 km
1998 Serguei Ivanov  Russia 8 1434 km
1997 Rolf Järmann   Switzerland 8 1499 km
1996 Viatcheslav Djavanian  Russia 8 1346 km
1995 Zbigniew Spruch  Poland 7 1254 km
1994 Maurizio Fondriest  Italy 7 1110 km
1993 Dariusz Baranowski  Poland 12 1794 km
1992 Dariusz Baranowski  Poland 8 1149 km
1991 Dariusz Baranowski  Poland 8 1222 km
1990 Mieczysław Karłowicz  Poland 9 1207 km
1989 Marek Wrona  Poland 8 1271 km
1988 Andrzej Mierzejewski  Poland 7 1016 km
1987 Zbigniew Piątek  Poland 8 1162 km
1986 Marek Kulas  Poland 10 1490 km
1985 Marek Leśniewski  Poland 10 1224 km
1984 Andrzej Mierzejewski  Poland 9 1219 km
1983 Tadeusz Krawczyk  Poland 9 1147 km
1982 Andrzej Mierzejewski  Poland 8 892 km
1981 Jan Brzezny  Poland 9 1 195 km
1980 Czesław Lang  Poland 10 1282 km
1979 Henryk Charucki  Poland 9 1335 km
1978 Jan Brzezny  Poland 11 1415 km
1977 Lechosław Michalak  Poland 10 1460 km
1976 Janusz Kowalski  Poland 10 1499 km
1975 Tadeusz Mytnik  Poland 10 1440 km
1974 André Delcroix  Belgium 11 1593 km
1973 Lucjan Lis  Poland 12 1512 km
1972 José Luis Viejo  Spain 10 1194 km
1971 Stanisław Szozda  Poland 12 1291 km
1970 Jan Stachura  Poland 12 1611 km
1969 Wojciech Matusiak  Poland 13 1795 km
1968 Jan Kudra  Poland 12 1757 km
1967 Andrzej Blawdzin  Poland 11 1682 km
1966 Józef Gawliczek  Poland 10 1272 km
1965 Józef Beker  Poland 9 1318 km
1964 Rajmund Zieliński  Poland 10 1394 km
1963 Stanisław Gazda  Poland 8 1482 km
1962 Jan Kudra  Poland 8 1278 km
1961 Henryk Kowalski  Poland 8 1329 km
1960 Roger Diercken  Belgium 8 1336 km
1959 Wiesław Podobas  Poland 11 1621 km
1958 Bogusław Fornalczyk  Poland 11 2038 km
1957 Henryk Kowalski  Poland 11 1968 km
1956 Marian Więckowski  Poland 8 1221 km
1955 Marian Więckowski  Poland 10 1563 km
1954 Marian Więckowski  Poland 12 1925 km
1953 Mieczysław Wilczewski  Poland 13 2311 km
1952 Wacław Wójcik  Poland 11 1959 km
1949 Francesco Locatelli  Italy 12 1994 km
1948 Wacław Wójcik  Poland 11 1963 km
1947 Stanislaw Grzelak  Poland 4 606 km
1939 Bolesław Napierała  Poland 8 1291 km
1937 Bolesław Napierała  Poland 9 1336 km
1933 Jerzy Lipiński  Poland 9 1721 km
1929 Józef Stefański  Poland 12 2250 km
1928 Feliks Więcek  Poland 8 1491 km

External links[edit]