Tower City, North Dakota

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Tower City, North Dakota
City
Motto: "Home of the ND State Horse Pull"[1]
Location of Tower City, North Dakota
Location of Tower City, North Dakota
Coordinates: 46°55′24″N 97°40′30″W / 46.92333°N 97.67500°W / 46.92333; -97.67500Coordinates: 46°55′24″N 97°40′30″W / 46.92333°N 97.67500°W / 46.92333; -97.67500
Country United States
State North Dakota
Counties Cass, Barnes
Area[2]
 • Total 2.08 sq mi (5.39 km2)
 • Land 2.08 sq mi (5.39 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,171 ft (357 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 253
 • Estimate (2013[4]) 264
 • Density 121.6/sq mi (47.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 58071
Area code(s) 701
FIPS code 38-79340
GNIS feature ID 1036349[5]
Website Tower City, North Dakota

Tower City is a city in Barnes and Cass counties in the State of North Dakota. The population was 253 at the 2010 census.[6]

History[edit]

The area in Cass and Barnes counties that eventually became Tower City was purchased in the 1860s by the Northern Pacific Railroad, for the purpose of constructing a northern transcontinental railroad. Difficulties in management and the influence of the Panic of 1873 led to the railroad seeking bankruptcy protection in June 1875. A member of the board of directors of the company, Pennsylvania attorney Charlemagne Tower purchased huge tracts of the railroad's lands in Minnesota, Washington, and North Dakota.

In 1878, a man named George Ellsbury, a former artist for Harper's Weekly and Leslie's Illustrated Magazine turned real estate agent, came to Tower's lands in Cass and Barnes Counties, ND. Convinced that the area then known as Spring Tank would be the ideal setting for a community, Ellsbury contacted Tower about purchasing the site. Tower then hired Ellsbury as his land agent for this area, offering him a 5% commission on all land sold. Ellisbury acquired Spring Tank by January 1879, and laid out the town that came to be known as Tower City, after Ellsbury's benefactor. Tower had written Ellsbury requesting that he name the town after himself instead, but that request was turned down.[1]

Tower City was founded in 1879.

Geography[edit]

Tower City is located at 46°55′24″N 97°40′30″W / 46.92333°N 97.67500°W / 46.92333; -97.67500 (46.923335, -97.675109).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.08 square miles (5.39 km2), all of it land.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 159
1890 309 94.3%
1900 468 51.5%
1910 452 −3.4%
1920 447 −1.1%
1930 435 −2.7%
1940 364 −16.3%
1950 292 −19.8%
1960 300 2.7%
1970 289 −3.7%
1980 293 1.4%
1990 233 −20.5%
2000 252 8.2%
2010 253 0.4%
Est. 2013 264 4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
2013 Estimate[9]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 253 people, 106 households, and 72 families residing in the city. The population density was 121.6 inhabitants per square mile (47.0 /km2). There were 115 housing units at an average density of 55.3 per square mile (21.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.6% White, 1.6% Native American, and 0.8% from two or more races.

There were 106 households of which 34.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 8.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.1% were non-families. 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.81.

The median age in the city was 39.6 years. 24.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 33.9% were from 25 to 44; 25.6% were from 45 to 64; and 10.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.4% male and 48.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 252 people, 107 households, and 75 families residing in the city. The population density was 121.2 people per square mile (46.8/km²). There were 113 housing units at an average density of 54.3 per square mile (21.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.81% White, and 1.19% from two or more races.

There were 107 households out of which 35.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 4.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.9% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 104.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,607, and the median income for a family was $41,250. Males had a median income of $26,806 versus $21,875 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,652. About 5.1% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.7% of those under the age of eighteen and 4.9% of those sixty five or over.

Education[edit]

Tower City is served by the Maple Valley School District. The district has two elementary schools and one high school. Maple Valley High School (North Dakota) is located in Tower City.[1][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Tower City, North Dakota". Tower City, North Dakota. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-14. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-14. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-06-16. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2 May 2011. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved July 22, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Retrieved June 16, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Maple Valley School District". Maple Valley School District. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 

External links[edit]