Toyota Corolla (E20)

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Toyota Corolla (E20)
Toyota Corolla E20 April 1976 1166cc.JPG
Toyota Corolla E20 2-door sedan
Overview
Also called Toyota Sprinter
Production May 1970–May 1978[1]
Assembly Toyota City, Japan
Port Melbourne, Australia [2]
Jakarta, Indonesia[citation needed]
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupé
2/4-door sedan
3/5-door station wagon
3/5-door van
Layout FR layout
Powertrain
Engine 1.2 L 3K I4
1.4 L T I4
1.6 L 2T I4
Transmission 4/5-speed manual
3-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,335 mm (91.9 in)[3]
Length 3,945 mm (155.3 in) (coupé)[4]
3,990 mm (157.1 in) (van)[5]
Width 59.3 in (1,506 mm)[4]
Height 53 in (1,346 mm) [4]
Curb weight 730 kg (1,609 lb) to 910 kg (2,006 lb)
Chronology
Predecessor Corolla E10
Successor Corolla E30

The Corolla E20 was the second generation of cars sold by Toyota under the Corolla nameplate.

The second-generation KE2# / TE2# model, launched in May 1970, had "coke-bottle" styling. It had a longer 2,335 mm (91.9 in) wheelbase. The front suspension design was improved greatly, using a swaybar, however the rear remained relatively similar. The Corolla became the second-best selling car in the world that year. Grades for sedan were Standard, Deluxe, and Hi-Deluxe. The coupé was offered in Deluxe, SL, SR, and Levin ("levin" is Old English for "lightning").

Minor changes were made in September 1971[1] with a new grille, turn signal lights, and tail lights, along with similar treatment to the Sprinter. A further facelift was done in August 1972.[1]

Japan (1970–1978)[edit]

Most models stopped production in July 1974[1] but the KE26 wagon and van were still marketed in Japan alongside the new 30-series, until production finally ended in 1978.

Load carrying duties of the Corolla Van were lightened by the arrival of the all new Toyota TownAce in 1976, while its twin the Toyota LiteAce was sold at Toyota Auto Store locations next to the Sprinter, with both vehicles using the Corolla/Sprinter 1,200 cc 3K-J, and 1,600 cc 2T-J and 12T-U engines.

Japanese engines:

  • 3K — 1.2 L (1,166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 68 PS (50 kW)[3]
  • 3K-D — 1.2 L (1,166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 73 PS (54 kW)[3]
  • 3K-B — 1.2 L (1,166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb, 77 PS (57 kW)[3]
  • T — 1.4 L (1,407 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 86 PS (63 kW)[6]
  • T-D — 1.4 L (1,407 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 90 PS (66 kW)[6]
  • T-B — 1.4 L (1,407 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb, 95 PS (70 kW)[6]
  • 2T-B — 1.6 L (1,588 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb, 105 PS (77 kW)[7]
  • 2T-G — 1.6 L (1,588 cc) I4, 8-valve DOHC, twin carb, 115 PS (85 kW)[7]
  • 2T-GR — 1.6 L (1,588 cc) I4, 8-valve DOHC, twin carb, 110 PS (81 kW)[8]

JPN-market chassis:[8]

  • KE20 — 1,166 cc Sedan, 2-door/4-door (Std, DX, Hi-DX)
  • TE20 — 1,407 cc Sedan, 2-door/4-door (Std, DX, Hi-DX)
  • TE21 — 1,588 cc Sedan, 2-door/4-door
  • KE25 — 1,166 cc Coupé (DX, Hi-DX, SL)
  • TE25 — 1,407 cc Coupé (DX, Hi-DX, SL, SR)
  • TE27 — 1,588 cc Coupé (Levin)
  • KE26V — 1,166 cc Wagon/Van, 3-door/5-door (Std, DX)
  • TE28 — 1,588 cc Wagon, 5-door

Export engines:

  • 3K — 1.2 L (1,166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 58 PS (43 kW) (DIN)[8] / 68 PS (50 kW) (SAE)[9]
  • 3K-H — 1.2 L (1,166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 55 PS (40 kW) (DIN) - desmogged version, introduced in fall of 1974[8]
  • 2T — 1.6 L (1,588 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 75 PS (55 kW) (DIN)

USA (1970–1974)[edit]

In the USA, most body styles were available, although the 1.4 liter and twincam engines were never offered. An optional 1,588 cc (97 cu in), 102 hp (76 kW) engine was added in September 1970, a quite impressive power output for the time. Either a four-speed manual or a three-speed automatic were offered, until sporty five-speed coupés called the S5 and SR5 were introduced in 1972. In 1974, the SR5 was entered by Car & Driver magazine's team in SCCA competition. In Japan, the SR5 was called the Corolla Levin.

American engines (SAE norms):

  • 3K-C — 1.2 L (1,166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 73 hp (54 kW) (gross) / 55 hp (41 kW) (net)
  • 2T-C — 1.6 L (1,588 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 102 hp (76 kW) at 6,000 rpm[6]

US-market chassis:

  • TE21 — Sedan, 2-door/4-door (Std, DX, Hi-DX)
  • TE26 — Wagon, DX
  • TE27 — Coupé (SR5)

Gallery[edit]

1972–1974 Corolla (KE25) Deluxe coupe (Australia) 
1972–1974 Corolla (KE25) Deluxe coupe (Australia) 
Corolla four-door sedan (Laos) 
Corolla Levin (Japan) 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Toyota Vehicle Identification Manual. Japan: Toyota Motor Corporation – Overseas Parts Department. 1984. Catalog No.97913-84. 
  2. ^ "1971 Toyota Corolla KE20 2 Door Sedan". Shannons. Australia. Retrieved 2013-08-02. 
  3. ^ a b c d Braunschweig, Robert; et al, eds. (March 14, 1974). "Automobil Revue '74" (in German/French) 69. Berne, Switzerland: Hallwag AG. p. 494. ISBN 3-444-66015-1 Check |isbn= value (help). 
  4. ^ a b c "Autocar Road Test: Toyota Corolla 1200 SL (1,166 c.c.): New coupe version of Japanese small car. Good performance and excellent economy. Brakes heavy and tend to fade; firm suspension, poor tyre grip. Price reasonable in view of all the included extras". Autocar. 134 (nbr 3908): pages 6–9. 18 February 1971. 
  5. ^ 愛される車づくり。トヨタはあすにいどみます。 [Lovable car manufacture. Toyota dares to defy tomorrow.] (catalog) (in Japanese), Toyota Motor Co., 1972, p. 2 
  6. ^ a b c d Automobil Revue '74, p. 495
  7. ^ a b Automobil Revue '74, p. 496
  8. ^ a b c d Hajek, Alexander. "Toyota Corolla E2". Toyotaoldies.de. Retrieved 2012-01-13. 
  9. ^ Automobil Revue '74, p. 149