Toys (video game)

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Toys: Let the Toy Wars Begin!
Toys
Genesis box art
Developer(s) Imagineering, Inc.[1]
Publisher(s) Absolute Entertainment
Designer(s) Jason Benham
David Crane
Alex Demeo
Bill Jannott
Ron Roberts
Composer(s) Mark Van Hecke[2]
Platform(s) Super NES
Sega Genesis
Release date(s) Sega Genesis: Super NES:
Genre(s) Action
Mode(s) Single-player
Distribution 8-megabit cartridge

Toys: Let the Toy Wars Begin is an action video game for the Super NES and Sega Genesis released in 1993.

The game is based on the 1992 film Toys starring Robin Williams. Chaos has been spread at a toy factory that must be stopped by the player.

Plot[edit]

An irresponsible young man (Leslie Zevo) wouldn't take over the company and now his father is dying. In order to get his young adult son to accept his new responsibilities, the father must force him to reclaim his toy factory from a straight-laced Army general (Lt. General Leland) that he has appointed as part of a "test of maturity.[1]"

Gameplay[edit]

Players can destroy a variety of toys with their weapons; including Jeeps and combat helicopters.

Players are involved in a "toy war" between an army of military-style toys fought with a personalized action figure army using toys found in certain places in the game. The player will start each level only possessing a limited supply of toys, whereas the general will have a virtually unlimited supply of toys to throw at the player. These toys range from the realistic (bowling balls) to the cartoonish (i.e., peanut gun projectiles, radio-controlled cars, water balloons). Crashing a toy plane into General Zevo's windows allows players to beat the game. However, they have to navigate the plane through a scale model of Manhattan and avoid running out of power.[5]

Reception[edit]

Reception
Review scores
Publication Score
AllGame 2/5 stars
GamePro 3.8/5 stars
Mega 20%[6]

Mega described the game as "a poor quality game using a film licence for a plot", and giving the addiction factor 1/10.

The game was included in an episode of Wez and Larry's Top Tens (In this case, 'Top Ten Worst Movie Licences') and came 4th. It was described by Larry as 'mind-numbingly monotonous', and he ended the slot by saying: "This is one 'toy' that you definitely want to keep out of the reach of small children."

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Toys information". MobyGames. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  2. ^ "Composer information". SNES Music. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  3. ^ "Sega Genesis version information". GameFAQs. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  4. ^ "Super NES version information". GameFAQs. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  5. ^ "Toys game overview". allgame. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  6. ^ Mega review, issue 13, page 43, October 1993