Tracey Curro

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Tracey Currolision
Born Tracey Ilana Curro
(1963-11-27) 27 November 1963 (age 50)
Ingham, Queensland, Australia
Nationality Australian
Education Queensland University of Technology
Occupation Television journalist

Tracey Ilana Curro (born 27 November 1963 in Ingham, Queensland) is an Australian journalist who was a newsreader for TV stations GMV-6, QTQ-9 and ATV-10[1] before reporting for the Seven Network's Beyond 2000, a science-technology show, and then 60 Minutes, the Australian version of the current affairs show. Curro previously filled in for National Nine News Melbourne weekend presenter Jo Hall,[2] she also used to present weekly Crimestopper reports on the Nine Network. Curro is a graduate of the Queensland University of Technology (Bachelor of Business – Communications) and the Institute of Strategic Leadership, New Zealand.[3]

She was embroiled in a court case when she broke her contract with the producers of Beyond 2000 to join 60 Minutes: Curro v Beyond Productions Pty Ltd (1993) 30 NSWLR 337, decided 7 May 1993.[4]

She can occasionally be heard filling in for regular presenters on 774 ABC Melbourne radio, notably filling in for a two-week period in 2005 following the departure of Virginia Trioli,[5] and has written for Australian Women's Weekly.[6]

One of her prized moments of television, occurred when she asked Pauline Hanson if she was Xenophobic. The famous response "Please Explain" has now become an Australia classic, and is a line for which Hanson is remembered. Tracey Curro was also the Communications Manager for Sustainability Victoria—the greenhouse reduction arm of the Victorian Government.[7] She is currently a Principal Consultant with leading Executive Recruitment Firm, SHK, specialising in marketing and communications, corporate and public affairs, government relations, internal communication and sustainability.

Curro has also acted as a fill in presenter for Carrie Bickmore on news-chat show The Project, and was particularly prominent on the show in 2010–11.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Enker, Debi: Headline act, The Age, 8 September 2005.
  2. ^ The year that was, The Age, 1 January 2004.
  3. ^ http://www.saxton.com.au/tracey-curro Tracey Curro – Speaker Profile – Saxton Speakers Bureau
  4. ^ Brooks, Adrian (2001). "The Limits of Competition: Restraint of Trade in the Context of Employment Contracts". University of New South Wales Law Journal 24 (2). 
  5. ^ Farouque, Farah: In search of a host, The Age, 20 August 2005.
  6. ^ Minion, Lynne: Wise wife's duty to stop them punching above their weight, The Age, 28 September 2009.
  7. ^ Household gets a wriggle on, The Age, 17 June 2007.