Trained incapacity

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In sociology, trained incapacity "refers to that state of affairs in which one's abilities function as inadequacies or blind spots."[1] It means that people's past experiences can lead to wrong decisions when circumstances change.[2][3] Thorstein Veblen invented the concept in 1933.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert King Merton (1968). Handschift und charakter: gemeinverstandlicher abriss der graphologischen technik. Simon and Schuster. p. 252. ISBN 978-0-02-921130-4. Retrieved 28 March 2013. 
  2. ^ Felix Merz (23 July 2011). Max Weber ́s Theory of Bureaucracy and Its Negative Consequences. GRIN Verlag. p. 16. ISBN 978-3-640-96563-2. Retrieved 28 March 2013. 
  3. ^ Jon M. Shepard (9 January 2009). Sociology. Cengage Learning. p. 158. ISBN 978-0-495-59901-2. Retrieved 28 March 2013. 
  4. ^ Kenneth Burke (1984). Permanence and Change: An Anatomy of Purpose. University of California Press. p. 7. ISBN 978-0-520-04146-2. Retrieved 28 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Wais, Erin (Fall 2005). "Trained Incapacity: Thorstein Veblen and Kenneth Burke". K.B. Journal 2 (1). Retrieved 28 March 2013.