Transitional Government of Ethiopia

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Transitional Government of Ethiopia
የኢትዮጵያ ሽግግር መንግሥት
ye-Ītyōṗṗyā Yašegeger Mangeśt

1991–1995
 

Flag Emblem
Anthem
Ethiopia, Ethiopia, Ethiopia be first (1991–1992)[1]
March Forward, Dear Mother Ethiopia (1992–1995)[2]
Territory of Ethiopia until May 1993.
Capital Addis Ababa
Languages Amharic
Government Marxist Provisional government
President
 -  1991–1995 Meles Zenawi
Prime Minister
 -  1991–1995 Tamirat Layne
Legislature Shengo
Historical era Post–Cold War
 -  Capture of Addis Ababa 28 May 1991
 -  Eritrean independence referendum 23–25 April 1993
 -  Secession of Eritrea 24 May 1993
 -  Constituent Assembly election 5 June 1994
 -  General election May–June 1995
 -  Constitution adopted 21 August 1995
Area
 -  1991[3] 1,221,900 km² (471,778 sq mi)
 -  1993[4] 1,127,127 km² (435,186 sq mi)
Population
 -  1991[3] est. 53,191,127 
     Density 43.5 /km²  (112.7 /sq mi)
 -  1993[4] est. 53,278,446 
     Density 47.3 /km²  (122.4 /sq mi)
 -  1995[5] est. 55,979,018 
     Density 49.7 /km²  (128.6 /sq mi)
Currency Ethiopian birr (ETB)
Calling code +251
Today part of  Ethiopia
 Eritrea

The Transitional government of Ethiopia was established immediately after the fall of the People's Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. It was led by Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia. Zenawi remained the prime minister of Ethiopia until his death on August 20, 2012.

In 1995 a constitution was adopted which ended the period of transition and created a democratic federal structure for the government. It adopted the name "Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia" for the country, and redrew the provinces into ethnicity based regions, similar to how India formed its states soon after independence.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ethiopia (1975-1992)". nationalanthems.info. 1975-03-21. Retrieved 2014-03-05. 
  2. ^ "Ethiopia Âť". Nationalanthems.info. Retrieved 2014-03-05. 
  3. ^ "Full text of "The 1991 CIA World Factbook"". Archive.org. Retrieved 2014-03-05. 
  4. ^ "Full text of "The 1993 CIA World Factbook"". Archive.org. Retrieved 2014-03-05. 
  5. ^ "Full text of "The 1995 CIA World Factbook"". Archive.org. Retrieved 2014-03-05.