Transport in Burma

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The government of Myanmar (known as Burma before gaining independence from the British Empire) has two ministries controlling transportation:

  1. Ministry of Rail Transport
  2. Ministry of Transport

Railways[edit]

As of February 2008, Burma had 5,099 km (3,168 mi) of railways, all 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in) gauge. There are currently no rail links to adjacent countries.

Roadways[edit]


total: 27,000 km (16,777 mi)
paved: 3,200 km (1,988 mi)
unpaved: 23,800 km (14,789 mi) (2006)

The main highways are:

There is one expressway in the country, featuring double carriageway and four lanes on its entire length:

Waterways[edit]

12,800 km (7,954 mi); 3,200 km (1,988 mi) navigable by large commercial vessels. (2008)

Orient-Express Hotels Ltd. operates its business in Ayeyarwady River by the name Road to Mandalay River Cruise. Irrawaddy Flotilla Company was also in service along the Ayeyarwady River in the 20th century, until 2003.

Pipelines[edit]

Ports and harbours[edit]

Sea[edit]

  • Sittwe (Akyab)
  • Dawei - railhead - new deepwater port under construction 2005

River[edit]

Merchant marine[edit]


total: 24 ships (with a volume of 1,000 gross register tons (GRT) or over) totaling 472,284 GRT/716,533 tonnes deadweight (DWT)
Ships by type: bulk carrier 1, cargo ship 17, passenger ship 2, passenger/cargo 3, specialized tanker 1 (2008)
note: a flag of convenience registry; includes ships of 3 countries: Cyprus 1, Germany 1, Japan 1

Airports[edit]

In July 2010, the country had 69 airports. Only 11 of them had runways over 10,000 feet (3248 meters). Of the 11, only Yangon International and Mandalay International had adequate facilities to handle larger jets.[2]
total: 69
over 3,047 m: 11
1524 to 3,047 m: 27
Under 1524 m: 31

Heliports[edit]

4 (2007)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Weekly Telegraph 23 January 2008 p17
  2. ^ "Myanmar Has 11 Airports with over 10,000 Foot Runways". Bi-Weekly Eleven (in Burmese) (Yangon) 3 (18): 7. 2010-07-30. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the CIA World Factbook.