Transport in Brazil

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Transport infrastructure in Brazil is characterized by strong regional differences and lack of development of the national rail network.[1] Brazil's fast growing economy, and especially the growth in exports, will place increasing demands on the transport networks.[2] However, sizeable new investments that are expected to address some of the issues are either planned or in progress.[2][3]

Railways[edit]

Further information: RFFSA
  • Total actual network: 29,295 km
Broad gauge: 4,932 km 1,600 mm (5 ft 3 in) gauge (939 km electrified)
Narrow gauge: 23,773 km 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in) gauge (581 km electrified)
Dual gauge: 396 km 1000 mm and 1600 mm gauges (three rails)
Standard gauge: 194 km 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) gauge: (2006)

Cities with Metros[edit]

Railway links with adjacent countries[edit]

International rail links exist between Brazil and Argentina, Bolivia and Uruguay.

Tramways (Street Railways)[edit]

Brazil had a hundred tramway systems.[4] Currently, there are vintage tramways operating in Belém,[5] Campinas,[6] Campos de Jordao,[7] Itatinga,[8] Rio de Janeiro[9] and Santos.[10]

High-speed rail[edit]

A high-speed rail connecting São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro is currently under development.[11] The high-speed line is not expected to be operational in time for the 2014 FIFA World Cup.[12]

Highways[edit]

BR-101 (the Translitorânea), with nearly 4,800km is the longest highway in Brazil.

Brazil has 1,751,868 kilometers of roads,[13] 96,353 km of them paved and 1,655,515 km unpaved. That means that only 5.5% of the roads are paved and that 94.5% are unpaved. The most important highway of the country is BR-116 and the second is BR-101.

The country has a low rate of car ownership of 140 per 1000 population, however in comparison to the other developing economies of the BRIC group Brazil exceeds India and China.[13]

Waterways[edit]

50,000 km navigable (most in areas remote from industry or population) (2008)

Pipelines[edit]

Seaports and harbors[edit]

Atlantic Ocean[edit]

Amazon river[edit]

Paraguay River (international water way)[edit]

Merchant marine[edit]


total: 136 ships (1,000 gross register tons (GRT) or over) totaling 3,964,808 GRT/6,403,284 metric tons deadweight (DWT)
ships by type: (1999 est.)

Airports[edit]

Most international flights must go to São Paulo–Guarulhos International Airport or Rio de Janeiro–Galeão International Airport. Belo Horizonte is the main international airport outside Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. A few go to Brasília, Recife, Natal, and just recently Fortaleza has accepted international flights. With South American integration, more airports can be expected to open to international flights.

Airports - with paved runways[edit]


total: 734
over 3,047 m: 7
2,438 to 3,047 m: 26
1,524 to 2,437 m: 169
914 to 1,523 m: 476
under 914 m: 56 (2008)

Airports - with unpaved runways[edit]


total: 3,442
1,524 to 2,437 m: 85
914 to 1,523 m: 1,541
under 914 m: 1,816 (2008)

National airlines[edit]

Heliports[edit]

  • 16 (2007)
  • 13 (2010)

See also[edit]

References[edit]