Treasurer of the Household

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The position of Treasurer of the Household is theoretically held by a household official of the British monarch, under the control of the Lord Steward's Department, but is, in fact, a political office held by one of the government's Deputy Chief Whips in the House of Commons. He was a member of the Board of Green Cloth, until the Board of Green Cloth disappeared in the reform of local government licensing in 2004, brought about by the Licensing Act 2003 (section 195).

The position had its origin in the office of Keeper of the Wardrobe of the Household and was ranked second after the Lord Steward. On occasion (e.g. 1488–1503) the office was vacant for a considerable period and its duties undertaken by the Cofferer. The office was often staffed by the promotion of the Comptroller and was normally held by a commoner (except in 1603-1618 and 1641-1645 when it was occupied by peers). The Treasurer was automatically a member of the privy council.

Treasurers of the Household[edit]

15th century[edit]

16th century[edit]

17th century[edit]

18th century[edit]

19th century[edit]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tiptoft, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27470.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ Curry, Anne. "Popham, Sir John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/22542.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  3. ^ Harriss, G. L. "Stourton family". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/52797.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  4. ^ Castor, Helen. "Tuddenham, Sir Thomas (1401–1462)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/50241.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  5. ^ Horrox, Rosemary. "Fogge, Sir John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/57617.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ Allen, E.W. The Antiquary, Volume 3, 1873, pg 313.