Treaty of Berlin (1921)

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The Treaty of Peace with Germany or the Treaty of Berlin in 1921, are terms used to describe the separate post-World War I peace treaty between the United States and Germany, signed on August 25, 1921.[1] While this treaty refers and adheres to some portions of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles, that treaty was only accepted by U.S. Senate's with amendments paralleling the Lodge Reservations; the amended version was not signed by President Woodrow Wilson, hence the United States was never a signatory of the Treaty of Versailles. This treaty was independently formulated under the administration of the Republican Warren G. Harding, who had defeated the Democratic candidate, James M. Cox, in the 1920 presidential election. Cox had supported the contentious clauses of the Treaty of Versailles that established a League of Nations. Within days, the United States also signed separate treaties with Austria[2] and Hungary.[3]

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