Treaty with Tunis (1797)

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The Treaty with Tunis was signed on August 28, 1797, between the United States of America and the "Barbary State" of Tunis, nominally part of the Ottoman Empire. As the treaty provided in Article One:

There shall be a perpetual and constant peace between the United States of America and the magnificent Pasha, Bey of Tunis, and also a permanent friendship, which shall more and more increase.

The treaty is notable because of its religious language in the opening statement, namely recognizing the President of the United States of America as "the most distinguished among those who profess the religion of the Messiah, of whom may the end be happy."[1] Because of the presence of this clause, W.C. Anderson makes the argument that Christianity is adopted by this treaty.[1]

The treaty provided protection to Americans at a cost higher than the Treaty of Tripoli imposed.[citation needed]

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  1. ^ a b Rev. W.C. Anderson (1859). Notes Dr. Scott Bible and Politics. Nabu Press. Retrieved 19 October 2009. It begins: "God is infinite. Under the auspices of the greatest," etc., "whose reign may God prosper until the end of ages," etc., then gives the titles of the Bey of Tunis and other dignitaries; "and the most distinguished and honored President of the United States of America, the most distinguished among those who profess the religion of the Messiah, of whom may the end be happy. We have concluded between us," etc. It may as well be argued that the religion of the Messiah is adopted by this treaty. 

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