Trebaruna

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Trebaruna, also Treborunnis and possibly *Trebarunu was a Lusitanian deity, probably a goddess.

Trebaruna's cult was located in the cultural area of Gallaecia and Lusitania (in the territory of modern Galicia (Spain) and Portugal). Her name could be derived from the Celtic *trebo (home) and *runa (secret, mystery), suggesting a protector or protectress of property, home and families.[1]

Two small altars dedicated to this goddess were found in Portugal, one in Roman-Lusitanian Egitania (current Proença-a-Velha) and another in Lardosa. The Tavares Proença Regional Museum in Castelo Branco now contains the altar from Lardosa. It was located in an area where the people from a Castro settlement founded a Roman-Lusitanian villa. This altar used to hold a statue of the goddess which has since been lost. Nevertheless, it still preserves these inscriptions: TREBARONNE V(otum) S(Olvit) OCONUS OCONIS f(ilius). Which translate as: Oconus, son of Oco, has fulfilled the vow to Trebaruna.[2] A name Trebarune (probably in the dative case) also appears on the inscription of Cabeço das Fráguas as a divinity receiving a sacrifice of a sheep.

Following the announcement in 1895 by José Leite de Vasconcelos of the discovery of Trebaruna as a new theonym, a poem celebrating this was published which likened Trebaruna to the Roman Victoria.[3] She has recently[4] become among neo-Pagans, a goddess of battles and alliances.[5] The Portuguese metal-band Moonspell composed a song called "Trebaruna" which is a celebration of the goddess.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ O Archeologo Português, 1/29, 1933, p.163
  2. ^ ibid, pp. 165-166
  3. ^ Trebaruna, deusa Lusitana, ode heroica, José Leite de Vasconcelos, Barcelos : Typographia da Aurora do Cavado (1895)
  4. ^ O que é a Pagan Federation?
  5. ^ Pagan Federation Portugal