Trevor Munroe

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Trevor St George Munroe (born 10 December 1944) is a Jamaican political scientist, labour activist, and politician.

Biography[edit]

Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Munroe attended high school at St. George's College (Class of 1959) and later studied political science at the University of the West Indies, Mona. He won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University, where he obtained the D.Phil in political science for a landmark study of the process of decolonization in Jamaica between the 1930s and 1960s, published as The Politics of Constitutional Decolonization in 1972.[1]

On his return to Jamaica in the late 1960s, he became involved in the political ferment that followed the Rodney Riots of 1968. Monroe founded a trade union, the University and Allied Workers' Union, initially to represent janitorial and service staff at the UWI. In 1974 he founded the Workers' Liberation League (WLL), an explicitly pro-Soviet Marxist-Leninist organization. In 1978, working with Elean Thomas and others,[2] He transformed the WLL into the Workers Party of Jamaica (WPJ), and served as its general secretary.[3]

The WPJ dissolved in 1992, following the collapse of the Soviet Union.[4] After the elections of 1997 Monroe was appointed an independent senator by Prime Minister Percival Patterson. In 2002, he was reappointed to the Senate as a member of the People's National Party.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Politics of Constitutional Decolonization: Jamaica, 1944-62, Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the West Indies, 1972.
  2. ^ Johnson, Buzz (31 July 2004). "Elean Thomas: Writer with a message of human rights". The Guardian. Retrieved 8 September 2011. 
  3. ^ World Marxist review, Volume 30, Issues 1-6, p. 35.
  4. ^ Alexander, Robert J.; Parker, Eldon M. (September 2004). A History of Organized Labor in the English-speaking West Indies. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 56–57. ISBN 978-0-275-97743-6. Retrieved 31 August 2011.