Trey Ideker

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Trey Ideker
Institutions University of California San Diego
Alma mater Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
University of Washington
Thesis Validation and refinement of genetic networks in yeast (2001)
Doctoral advisor Leroy Hood
Notable awards Overton Prize (2009)
Website
idekerlab.ucsd.edu

Trey Ideker is the Chief of Genetics and Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering at University of California San Diego (UCSD). His research uses genomic data in order to construct network models of cellular processes and diseases.[1][2]

Education[edit]

Ideker gained his B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from M.I.T. in 1994, his M.Eng. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from M.I.T. in 1995 and his Ph.D. in Molecular Biotechnology from the University of Washington in 2001 under the supervision of Leroy Hood.[1] While working with Hood, Ideker was one of the first researchers to publish an integrated computational model of a metabolic network.[3][4] As of 2014, the paper describing this model has been cited over 1,900 times.[5]

Career[edit]

Following his PhD, Ideker worked at the Whitehead Institute. While there, he helped to develop the network modelling software Cytoscape.[4][6] Ideker moved to UCSD in 2003.[7]

Roles and Awards[edit]

Ideker has served as Adjunct Professor at the Moores Cancer Center and has acted as a consultant for companies including Monsanto and Mendel Biotechnology.[1]

As of 2014, Ideker serves on the Editorial Board of Bioinformatics and the Editorial Advisory Board of PLOS Computational Biology.[8][9]

In 2005, Ideker was named by the MIT Technology Review TR35 as one of the top 35 innovators in the world under the age of 35.[10] The following year, Technology Review named him as one of the top 10 innovators of 2006.[7]

In 2009, he was awarded the Overton Prize by the International Society for Computational Biology in recognition of his significant contribution to the field of computational biology.[4][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c http://idekerlab.ucsd.edu/people/Pages/trey-ideker.aspx Dr. Trey Ideker
  2. ^ "Keynote Speaker Abstracts & Biographies". http://www.iscb.org. Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  3. ^ Ideker, T; Thorsson, V; Ranish, JA; Christmas, R; Buhler, J; Eng, JK; Bumgarner, R; Goodlett, DR; Aebersold, R; Hood, L (May 4, 2001). "Integrated genomic and proteomic analyses of a systematically perturbed metabolic network.". Science 292 (5518): 929–34. doi:10.1126/science.292.5518.929. PMID 11340206. 
  4. ^ a b c Morrison Mckay, B. J.; Sansom, C. (2009). "Webb Miller and Trey Ideker to Receive Top International Bioinformatics Awards for 2009 from the International Society for Computational Biology". PLoS Computational Biology 5 (4): e1000375. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000375. PMC 2666155. PMID 19390599.  edit
  5. ^ "Trey Ideker - Google Scholar Citations". Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  6. ^ Shannon, P; Markiel, A; Ozier, O; Baliga, NS; Wang, JT; Ramage, D; Amin, N; Schwikowski, B; Ideker, T (Nov 2003). "Cytoscape: a software environment for integrated models of biomolecular interaction networks.". Genome Research 13 (11): 2498–504. doi:10.1101/gr.1239303. PMC 403769. PMID 14597658. 
  7. ^ a b "Trey Ideker - Division of Medical Genetics - UC San Diego". http://medgenetics.ucsd.edu. Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  8. ^ "Oxford Journals - Science & Mathematics - Bioinformatics - Editorial Board". http://www.oxfordjournals.org. Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  9. ^ "PLOS Computational Biology Editorial Board". http://www.ploscompbiol.org. Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  10. ^ "2005 Young Innovators Under 35". Technology Review. 2005. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Overton Prize".