Trey McIntyre

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Trey McIntyre
Choreographer Trey McIntyre
Known for Dance
Website
http://treymcintyre.com

Trey McIntyre is an American dancer and choreographer, who has a body of work that includes around 100 original dance pieces.[1] He founded and acts as president of Trey McIntyre Project, a dance company based in Boise, Idaho,[2] where he lives in the historic Northend.[3]

Career[edit]

McIntyre was born in Wichita, Kansas,[4] and trained at North Carolina School of the Arts and Houston Ballet Academy. In 1989, he was appointed Choreographic Apprentice to Houston Ballet, a position created especially for him,[5] and in 1995 he became the company’s Choreographic Associate.[6] He has worked for 24 years as a freelance choreographer, producing close to 100 pieces during the span of his career so far.[5]

In 2005, McIntyre founded his dance company, Trey McIntyre Project (TMP), which first appeared at the Vail International Dance Festival. The company was initially a summer touring company, but its national and international success led McIntyre to establish the company year-round as of 2008, based in Boise, Idaho.[7][8] TMP has been featured in The New York Times, Dance Magazine, and on PBS NewsHour, and has earned coast-to-coast acclaim from the likes of the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, The Boston Globe,[9] People Magazine,[10] and elsewhere. In 2013, Trey McIntyre Project expanded its artistic vision and announced a crowdsourced documentary film entitled Ma Maison. The project was announced on Kickstarter on August 7, 2013, and in November 2013, McIntyre went to New Orleans to begin filming.[11]

On January 16, 2014, it was announced that McIntyre would move the Trey McIntyre Project towards new artistic ventures, reducing his efforts in dance. The company revealed a press release[12] explaining that McIntyre, after contributing heavily to the dance world, is interested in exploring other art forms, specifically film and the visual arts. He will continue to create pieces on a freelance basis but the dance aspect of Trey McIntyre Project is downsizing as he makes room for other artistic projects.[13]

McIntyre is the recipient of numerous awards, including a Choo San Goh Award for Choreography[7] and a Lifetime Achievement Award from The National Society of Arts and Letters,[14] as well as two grants for choreography from the National Endowment for the Arts.[15] His works have been performed by companies including Stuttgart Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, New York City Ballet, The Washington Ballet, and Oregon Ballet Theatre.[16]

Selected choreography works[edit]

  • "The Accidental" (2014)
  • "The Vinegar Works: For Dances of Moral Instruction" (2014)
  • "Mercury Half-Life" (2013)
  • "Pass, Away" (2013)
  • "Robust American Love" (2013)
  • "The Unkindness of Ravens" (2012)
  • "Ladies and Gentle Men" (2012)
  • "Bad Winter" (2012)
  • "Ways of Seeing" (2012)
  • "The Sweeter End" (2011)
  • "Gravity Heroes" (2011)
  • "Arrantza" (2010)
  • "Oh, Inverted World" (2010)
  • "Amado Mio" (2010)
  • "Ten Pin Episodes" (2010)
  • "This Awareness Moves Me Forward" (2010)
  • "(serious)" (2009)
  • "The Sun Road" (2009)
  • "Shape" (2009)
  • "The More I See You" (2009)
  • "Grass" (2009)
  • "Ma Maison" (2008)
  • "Leatherwing Bat" (2008)
  • "Surrender" (2008)
  • "Violent Femmes" (2008)
  • "Old Aunt Boyd" (2008)
  • "Wild Sweet Love" (2007)
  • "Queen of the Goths" (2007)
  • "In Dreams" (2007)
  • "A Day in the Life" (2007)
  • "The Blue Boy" (2007)
  • "Pork Songs" (2007)
  • "Pluck" (2007)
  • "Hymn" (2007)
  • "Go Out" (2006)
  • "Just" (2006)
  • "The Barramundi" (2006)
  • "Sacred Ellington" (2006)
  • "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (2005)
  • "Cherish" (2005)
  • "Rite of Spring (The Engagement)" (2005)
  • "I Am a Man" (2005)
  • "Pretty Good Year" (2004)
  • "Chasing Squirrel" (2004)
  • "loveCRAZY" (2004)
  • "The Naughty Boy!" (2004)
  • "The Illuminations" (2004)
  • "Sha-Sha" (2004)
  • "Memory of a Free Festival" (2004)
  • "The Illuminations" (2004)
  • "The Reassuring Effects (of Form and Poetry)" (2003)
  • "Grace" (2003)
  • "Full Grown Man" (2003)
  • "The Shadow" (2003)
  • "Peter Pan" (2002)
  • "Natural Flirt" (2002)
  • "High Lonesome" (2001)
  • "Spirits" (2001)
  • "Plush" (2001)
  • "Bound" (2000)
  • "The Difference Between Naked and Nude" (2000)
  • "Split" (2000)
  • "Blue Until June" (2000)
  • "Aliss in Wonderland" (1999)
  • "Dance, 5 Steps" (1999)
  • "Cantilena" (1999)
  • "Happy Ending" (1999)
  • "Memphis" (1999)
  • "Speak" (1998)
  • "White Noise" (1998)
  • "Like a Samba" (1997)
  • "Second Before the Ground" (1996)
  • "Touched" (1994)
  • "Steel and Rain" (1994)
  • "Curupira" (1994)
  • "MANTIS" (1993)
  • "Skeleton Clock" (1990)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Current repertoire". Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "Founders". Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  3. ^ Farmer, Jim (April 1, 2010). "Gay couple creates breathtaking ballet with Trey McIntyre Project". GA Voice (Atlanta). Retrieved 23 August 2012. 
  4. ^ "Trey McIntyre". Trey McIntyre Project. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b Atkins, Amy (September 3, 2008). "Raising the Barre". Boise Weekly. Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  6. ^ Reiter, Susan (September 21, 2008). "The Trey McIntyre Project begins inaugural tour". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b "About us". Trey McIntyre Project. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  8. ^ La Rocco, Claudia (August 13, 2010). "Dancers Adopt a City and Vice Versa". The New York Times. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Press". Trey McIntyre Project. 
  10. ^ http://www.whitebird.org/blog/2009/02/trey-mcintyre-people-magazine.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ "TMP Films - Trey McIntyre Project makes movies". Instagram. December 2013. 
  12. ^ "Trey McIntyre Project Announces New Direction for Year 10", TMP.
  13. ^ Oland, Dana. "Trey McIntyre Project to Disband as Full-Time Dance Company". Idaho Statesman. 
  14. ^ "Lensic Presents Trey McIntyre Project". The Lensic Performing Arts Center. April 11, 2013. 
  15. ^ "NEA 1995 Annual Report". NEA. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  16. ^ "Resumé". Trey McIntyre Project. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 

External links[edit]